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                    W R I T I N G   W O R L D

A World of Writing Information - For Writers Around the World

                  http://www.writing-world.com

Issue 13:09       13,220 subscribers                  May 2, 2013
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IN THIS ISSUE:
=================================================================

THE EDITOR'S DESK: So Many Books, So Little Time, by Moira Allen 
CRAFTING FABULOUS FICTION: My Point of View on Point of View 
(Part One), by Victoria Grossack 
NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
WRITING JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES
FEATURE: How to Write the Perfect Road-Trip Article, 
by Barbara Weddle
FREE STUFF FOR WRITERS: Making a Book Trailer, by Aline Lechaye   
THE WRITE SITES -- Online Resources for Writers
The Author's Bookshelf   
                           
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FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK
=================================================================

So Many Books, So Little Time
-----------------------------

It will probably come as no surprise to my readers to learn that I
have too ma...  I mean, I have, er, rather a LOT of books.  I think
the only room in the house that doesn't contain a bookshelf is the
laundry room.  The fiction shelves are stacked two-deep with
paperbacks, causing my husband to give them worried glances and
murmur things about "floor loading capacity."

I blame, of course, Goodwill.  They know me there.  Where else can
you pick up paperbacks for 50 cents each (or 40 cents if you buy
five or more)?  Realistically, as I look at the ever-growing
stacks, I must accept that I will probably NEVER manage to read
them all.  Especially if I keep acquiring at a rate of about three
new books to every one that I read and discard.

What has been more difficult to accept, however, is the realization
that I don't actually HAVE to.  I'm not getting any younger, and
the stacks aren't getting any smaller.  But it has begun to dawn on
me that "Life's too short to waste on the wrong books!"

I've heard many writers, and readers, speak of some book that they
are "struggling" to get through.  Usually it's either a popular
bestseller that "everyone" is raving about, or the sort of
"classic" that anyone with any pretense of education or culture
simply MUST read.  Often, the person speaks of this book, whatever
it is, in tones of awe; they just know, deep down, it is a
"wonderful" book.  But when they talk of READING it, they
describing "managing" to "get through" a page or two (or even a
paragraph or two) each night before falling asleep.  Often, one
gets the impression that the book itself is, in fact, conducive to
the "falling asleep" bit.

I began to wonder: Why DO we struggle through books we can barely
pick up, books we can't wait to put down?  The primary explanation,
I suspect, is that many of us believe that public opinion is wiser
than personal taste.  "Everyone" says this book is a must-read. 
"Everyone" loves it.  How can "everyone" be wrong?  So you try, and
you try, and you try -- and the book sits on your nightstand for
months, the bookmark inching through the pages so slowly that it
would require time-lapse photography to record its progress.

It's the "Emperor's New Clothes" syndrome, in books.

Further, I believe most of us compulsive readers have grown up with
a deeply ingrained belief that if you START a book, you ought to
FINISH it.  Picking it up may be hard, but putting it down and
simply walking away is even harder.  Leaving a book unfinished
feels a bit like failing some sort of test: Other people finished
it, why can't I?

That actually makes as much sense as assuming that if you date
someone, you must marry them.  In reality, you know that ending a
relationship that isn't working doesn't mean there was anything
wrong with you OR the other person -- it simply means you weren't
right for each other.  The same is true of books: There are
thousands of books and thousands of readers who are simply not
right for one another.  

"But what if it gets better?" we ask, pushing on for yet another
page, yet another chapter in hopes that the plot might pick up, the
dialogue become more entertaining, or that we might find a
character we actually care about.  And in fairness, I've picked up
books that have had an unpromising start, but that have gone on to
capture my interest not only for that volume but for an entire
series.  

With that in mind, I've developed a two-stage "triage" program for
the books I drag home from Goodwill.  First, I read the first two
or three pages.  Sometimes, that's enough to tell me that the
topic, style or characters aren't to my taste.  If I haven't felt
the urge to put the book aside by the third or fourth page,
however, I move it to the "to be read" pile (unless, of course, it
grabs me so completely that I have to finish it NOW).  When I next
pick it up, I'm willing to give it quite a bit more leeway.  But
if, by page 20 or 30 or thereabouts, I'm still not hooked, I no
longer hold out much hope that it is going to "get better" further
on.  Opening scenes are hard to write, and may not be fully
representative of an author's style -- but 20 or 30 pages IS.   

But does writing off a book mean writing off the author?  There, I
advise a bit of caution!  More than once, I've discarded a book and
sworn I'd never read another by that author again, only to pick up
another book later and find that I couldn't put it down.  An author
may write one series that you love and another that you hate.  One
author's first book may be his best; another's first may be her
worst.  Some authors get better over time; others seem to run out
of ideas.  However, at the same time, you can probably identify
factors that will help you decide whether you like an author AT
ALL.  If, for example, you're a reader who doesn't care for books
peppered with profanity, and every character in a book uses the "f"
word in virtually every paragraph, it's probably a safe bet that
you're not going to like other books by the same author.  If an
author is using a book as a platform to espouse views that you
strongly disagree with, it's also a safe bet that you won't want to
read more of that author's work.

In the long run, however, the best way to determine whether a book
is worthy of your time is by recognizing how you react to the
actual act of reading it.  I cherish my evening reading time, when
I curl up with a cup of decaf and a bowl of popcorn and (I hope) a
good book.  When I'm in the middle of a book and I can't wait to
get back to it, then that, for me, is a "good" book.  If, however,
I can't quite recall what I'm supposed to be reading, or feel no
enthusiasm for the evening read, that's not such a good sign.  I
also pay attention to whether my mind is "hooked" or wandering.  My
reading corner has no shortage of distractions: Other books,
magazines, catalogs, knitting, Sudoku games.  If I find that I'm
repeatedly putting the book down and picking up something else,
that's another indication that it isn't holding my attention.  I'm
sure I could find many excellent, clearly defined reasons for this,
but why bother?  My inner reader is simply telling me, "We're not a
match."

Finding the right book, finding a new author whose words charm you
and thrill you and inspire you, is a bit like falling in love. 
Just as life is too short to squander time, energy and emotion on
an unfulfilling relationship, it's also too short to spend a lot of
time with books we're not in love with.

-- Moira Allen, Editor

This article may be reprinted provided the author's byline, bio and
copyright notice are retained.  (For an author bio and complete
details on reprint terms, please visit 
http://www.writing-world.com/admin1/reprints.shtml)

Link to this article here:
http://www.writing-world.com/coffee/coffee62.shtml 
 
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Read by over 1,000 children's book and magazine editors, this
monthly newsletter can be your own personal source of editors'
wants and needs, market tips, and professional insights.  Get a
FREE issue to start. http://www.thechildrenswriter.com/BP640

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COLUMN: CRAFTING FABULOUS FICTION, My Point of View on Point of
View (Part One), by Victoria Grossack 

=================================================================
Point of View (POV) is a large and complicated topic, and your POV
choices have many implications for your storytelling.  Because of
this, I'll cover the topic in two columns.  Here we will consider
the definition of POV and look at some examples of a passage being
told from several different POVs.  Later we will consider the
implications of the application of POV for your storytelling -- as
well as some ways to get around strictures that may seem too
limiting. 

POV -- definition and examples 
------------------------------
POV refers to the viewpoint of a character through which the events
of the story are experienced. If you are in first person, then the
narrator's POV is nearly always the POV for the story.  If you are
writing in third person, you can choose to remain with a single
character for your entire work (limited); you can skip around; or
you can use the omniscient third person. 

In order to make this easier for you to understand, here are
several versions of the same passage: 

FIRST PERSON POV -- KATE 

I glanced at the clock over the kitchen sink as Dad twisted the cap
off the beer bottle.  It was his third in less than an hour. 

"How are you feelin', Kate?" he asked, his tone friendly despite
the alcohol.  "You ready for the big day?" 

I scratched the mosquito bite on my arm and did my best to smile at
him, even though I felt sick and exhausted from the pregnancy.  "As
ready as I can be, I guess." 

"All your dreams are comin' true.  You're gonna live in that big
house." 

"Yeah," I said, nibbling on a cracker.  I passed Springville's only
mansion -- the Marshall Manor -- twice most days, as I made my way
from the trailer park to the school and back.  Now I was going to
move into it, thanks to the fact that Thomas Marshall IV, my
pimply-faced classmate who did not resemble his handsome
forefathers, had gotten me pregnant.  We were getting married
tomorrow.  Despite our youth, his mother had consented, and my
wedding dress, a gift from the Marshalls, hung from a hook before
my tiny closet.  "I'm going to bed now." 

"Now?" asked my father.  "You're not staying up with me?" 

"I'm really tired."  I went to the corner where my bed was, and
stretched out on the thin mattress.  Even though the evening was
oppressively warm, I covered myself with a sheet.  And even though
I had so much to think about, so much to anticipate, I fell asleep
at once. 

I woke while it was still dark.  I was so hot that I was sweating. 

What sort of night was it, which got hotter instead of cooler?  I
pushed the sheet off me; a wave of nausea hit me, for the air
smelled funny. 

I blinked for a moment in the darkness, then sprang out of bed,
darting over to my father and shaking his shoulder.  "Dad!  Wake
up!  The trailer's on fire!" 

COMMENTS:  Some authors dislike writing the word "I" over and over.
 They may also feel that writing in the first person does not give
them enough scope, for the story is limited to whatever is
experienced or discovered by Kate. 

THIRD PERSON LIMITED POV -- KATE 

Her father twisted the cap off the beer bottle.  She glanced at the
clock over the kitchen sink.  It was his third in less than an
hour. 

"How are you feelin', Kate?" he asked, and his tone seemed friendly
despite the alcohol.  "You ready for the big day?" 

She scratched the mosquito bite on her arm and did her best to
smile at him, even though she felt sick and exhausted from the
pregnancy.  "As ready as I can be, I guess." 

"All your dreams are comin' true.  You're gonna live in that big
house." 

"Yeah," she said, nibbling on a cracker.  She passed Springville's
only mansion -- the Marshall Manor -- twice most days, as she made
her way from the trailer park to the school and back.  Now she was
going to move into it, thanks to the fact that Thomas Marshall IV,
her pimply-faced classmate who did not resemble his handsome
forefathers, had gotten her pregnant.  They were getting married
tomorrow. Despite their youth, his mother had consented, and Kate's
wedding dress, a gift from the Marshalls, hung from a hook before
her tiny closet.  "I'm going to bed now." 

"Now?" he asked.  "You're not staying up with me?" 

"I'm really tired."  She went to the corner where her bed was, and
stretched out on the thin mattress.  Even though the evening was
oppressively warm, she covered herself with a sheet.  And even
though she had so much to think about, so much to anticipate, she
fell asleep at once. 

She woke while it was still dark.  She was so hot that she was
sweating. 

What sort of night was it, which got hotter instead of cooler?  She
pushed off the sheet; a wave of nausea hit her, for the air smelled
funny. 

She blinked for a moment in the darkness, then sprang out of bed
and shook her father's shoulder.  "Dad!  Wake up!  The trailer's on
fire!" 

COMMENTS: Even though the person has changed, from first to third,
the story is very much the same.  This is as it should be, for the
POV is still Kate's, so the story is not changed.  As in the first
person narration, we are limiting ourselves to whatever is
experienced or discovered by Kate.  Note that shifting from first
person to third person requires attention to detail; even after
several passes, I still found pronouns that needed to be altered. 

THIRD PERSON LIMITED POV - GEORGE, KATE'S DAD 

George twisted the cap off the beer bottle.  It was his third, but
the air was hot and the beer was cold.  Besides, drinking was a
sight easier than talking to his pregnant teenage daughter. 

"How are you feelin', Kate?" he asked, trying to make conversation.
 "You ready for the big day?" 

She scratched a mosquito bite on her arm.  "As ready as I can be, I
guess." 

"All your dreams are comin' true.  You're gonna live in that big
house." 

"Yeah," she said, nibbling on a cracker.  "I'm going to bed now." 

"Now?" he asked, unable to keep the disappointment out of his
voice.  "You're not staying up with me?" 

"I'm really tired." 

He knew she could not wait to get away from him and this trailer. 
Hell, he could understand that!  He'd like to live in a big house,
too.  But he was stuck here; he couldn't bat his eyelashes at some
pimply-faced rich boy and get himself pregnant. 

Women had it good.  They latched on to some male, and if a fellow
didn't provide enough in the way of shoes and entertainment, they
just dumped him and moved on.  Like Jill, Kate's mother, nearly
eight years ago. 

George pulled out another beer.  It was going to be a long, dull
evening.  First Jill, now Kate -- before she finished high school,
even.  It was going to be a long, dull life. 

He watched the fireflies blinking and glanced hopefully at the
window of the next trailer over -- sometimes he could see the woman
next door changing.  But the window was dark.  He drained his
bottle.  He needed a lot of beer before he could sleep like Kate
was doing in the corner. But he finally staggered to his own bed. 

He was dreaming of wandering around a mansion in search of his
trailer when a hand shook his shoulder.  "Wha--?" he asked. 

"Dad!  Wake up!  The trailer's on fire!" 

COMMENTS: The passage from George's POV is significantly different
from the two passages from Kate's POV.  The passage now
incorporates George's thoughts and feelings, as well as what he
experiences.  Again, because we are using the limited variant of
POV, the reader only has access to whatever is experienced or
discovered by George.  A small point: the mosquito bite on Kate's
arm is no longer preceded by the article "the" but by the
indeterminate article "a" -- a recognition that the mosquito bite
is more significant to Kate than it is to George.

THIRD PERSON LIMITED MULTIPLE -- BOTH KATE & GEORGE 

Thirsty, he twisted the cap off the beer bottle. She glanced at the
clock over the kitchen sink. It was his third in less than an hour. 

COMMENTS: This actually shows both POVs within the same paragraph. 
The word "thirsty" indicates that it is GEORGE'S POV, for he is
better positioned to understand how he physically feels.  The next
two sentences are really from KATE'S POV, because she's the one
glancing at the clock and apparently counting her father's beers. 

Let's continue with this version of the passage: 

"How are you feelin', Kate?" he asked, the beer giving him the
strength to make conversation with his pregnant daughter.  "You
ready for the big day?" 

She scratched a mosquito bite on her arm and did her best to smile
at him, even though she was exhausted from the pregnancy and a wave
of nausea hit her.  "As ready as I can be, I guess." 

"All your dreams are comin' true.  You're gonna live in that big
house." 

"Yeah," she said, nibbling on a cracker.  She had passed
Springville's only mansion -- the Marshall Manor -- twice most
days, as she made her way from the trailer park to the school and
back.  Now she was going to move into it, thanks to the fact that
Thomas Marshall IV, her classmate whose appearance was not worthy
of his handsome forefathers, had gotten her pregnant.  They were
getting married tomorrow.  Despite their youth, his mother had
consented, and Kate's wedding dress, a gift from the Marshalls,
hung from a hook before her tiny closet.  "I'm going to bed now." 

"Now?" he asked, unable to keep the disappointment out of his
voice.  "You're not staying up with me?" 

"I'm really tired."  She went to the corner where her bed was, and
stretched out on the thin mattress.  Even though the evening was
oppressively warm, she covered herself with a sheet. And even
though she had so much to think about, so much to anticipate, she
fell asleep at once. 

George knew she could not wait to get away from him and this
trailer.  Hell, he could understand that!  He'd like to live in a
big house, too.  But he was stuck here; he couldn't bat his eyes at
some pimply-faced rich boy and get himself pregnant. 

Women had it good.  They latched on to some male, and if he didn't
provide enough in the way of shoes and entertainment, they just
dumped him and moved on.  Like Jill, Kate's mother, nearly eight
years ago. 

COMMENTS: In the passage above -- which I ended earlier because the
point was made and this column is already rather long -- we see the
POVs of both Kate and George.  One consequence of showing both POVs
is that the passage simply takes longer -- a result of there being
more story to tell.  I confess to not liking hopping between heads
-- especially within a single paragraph -- but some very successful
authors occasionally do it. 

THIRD PERSON OMNISCIENT 

The father and the daughter sat together in the small trailer.  The
daughter was counting the minutes until she could go to bed, partly
because she wanted the morning to come sooner, and have this last
day of living with her father be finished, and partly because she
was so unreasonably tired.  She supposed it was the pregnancy that
made her tired, although why it should, she didn't know. 

The father was also uncomfortable.   He twisted the cap off another
beer bottle and brought it to his lips.  Finally he spoke.  "How
you feelin', Kate?  You ready for the big day?" 

COMMENTS: Notice how these two paragraphs, all that I will show,
don't delve as deeply inside the head of either of the characters,
but are more distant, referring to the characters as "the father"
and "the daughter."  Instead, this POV addresses the reader more
directly.  You may opt to remain at this level. Or, you may opt to
begin in this POV, a sort of introduction for the reader, and then
slip into a writing style which is more intimately linked to one of
the characters. Switching between the omniscient and the limited
third is done quite often. 

Conclusion 
----------
Hopefully, the examples in this column will help you to recognize
the differences between the various versions of POV.  Although as a
writer you may shift between POVs, and you may mix and match, doing
so requires care.  If you are writing a novel in third person
limited from Kate's POV, you should pause before inserting a single
paragraph from George's POV.  Breaking POV -- especially going from
one character's head to another -- can jar or even confuse the
reader. Your decision to break this POV should be deliberate rather
than haphazard.

In My Point of View on Point of View, Part Two, we'll continue this
important subject.  See you soon!
 
>>--------------------------------------------------<<

Victoria Grossack studied Creative Writing and English Literature
at Dartmouth College, and has published stories and articles in
publications such as Contingencies, Women's World and I Love Cats.
Victoria is co-author with Alice Underwood of the Tapestry of
Bronze series (Jocasta; Children of Tantalus; The Road to Thebes;
Arrow of Artemis), based on Greek myths and set in the late Bronze
Age. On her own she has written The Highbury Murders, in which she
did her best to channel the spirits and styles of Jane Austen and
Agatha Christie. Besides all this, Victoria is married with kids,
and (though American) spends much of her time in Europe. Her
hobbies include gardening, hiking, bird-watching and tutoring
mathematics. Visit her website at http://www.tapestryofbronze.com,
or contact her at tapestry (at) tapestryofbronze (dot) com.
Copyright 2013 Victoria Grossack. A version of this article
appeared in the Coffeehouse for Writer's Fiction Fix.  

This article may not be reprinted or posted without the written
permission of the author.

Link to this article here: 
http://www.writing-world.com/victoria/crafting19.shtml

*****************************************************************

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NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
=================================================================
Harper Collins Launches Digital Thriller Imprint
------------------------------------------------
The William Morrow Imprint from Harper Collins has launched a new
mystery/crime/thriller digital imprint called Witness.  Witness
authors will receive 25% royalties or 50% once their book has sold
10,000 copies. All royalties will be paid on a monthly basis. For
more on this news story visit: http://tinyurl.com/c7cp6cl

Novelicious Blog To Publish Women's Fiction
-------------------------------------------
Novelicious Books is seeking to publish women's fiction and
novellas.  It is currently accepting submissions with translation
rights or rights to be printed in the UK.  Authors will receive 50%
of the sale proceeds of the books.  For more information visit:
http://www.noveliciousbooks.com/

Folio Prize to Accept Entries of Self-Published Works of Fiction
----------------------------------------------------------------
The Folio Prize for Fiction written in English from around the
world will be accepting self-published works this year. The Folio
Prize, worth 40,000, is the first major prize to allow entries of
self-published works.  For more on this story visit:  
http://www.thebookseller.com/news/folio-prize-allow-self-published-work.html

*****************************************************************

WRITING A MYSTERY OR CRIME STORY? Forensic Science for Writers: A
Reference Guide can help. Based on a long-running course offered
in colleges and universities, this survey shows you how to create
believable plot twists and enhance your stories with realistic
forensic details.  Available from Amazon and other bookstores.
For details visit http://forensics4writers.com/the-book

*****************************************************************

Writing Jobs and Opportunities
=================================================================

M Writer Residencies Open to Applications
-----------------------------------------
Applications for the 2014-5 M Writer's Residencies are now open. The
Programme funds three-month residencies in Bangalore, India and
Shanghai,
China for writers of fiction, nonfiction, poetry or dramatic prose.
(The
residency in India is at Sangam House, which can also be applied to
separately at http://www.sangamhouse.org )

The M Writer's Residencies have been established to disseminate a
broader
knowledge of contemporary life and writing in India and China today
and to
foster deeper intellectual, cultural and artistic links across
individuals
and communities.

Applications close on June 1, 2013.
http://www.m-restaurantgroup.com/mbund/Ms_residency.html

Able Muse Open to Submissions for Special Translation Issue
-----------------------------------------------------------
ABLE MUSE - a review of poetry, prose & art - will be releasing a
Special
Translation Issue, guest-edited by Charles Martin, and forthcoming
Summer
2014. This is an open call for submissions for this issue, which
will
feature several of today's eminent English-language translators. The
requirements are pretty straightforward --

1) Submit 1 to 5 previously unpublished and publishable
translations.
Although it's not mandatory, you may include the text of the
poem(s) in
the original language(s), if available.

2) Submission deadline is March 31, 2014. The response time varies
from 2
to 12 weeks.

3) You may submit:
       a) through the online submission form at
http://www.ablemuse.com/submit-translation-online/  OR,
       b) by email to translation at ablemuse.com

Bound Off Seeking Short Stories for Audio Magazine
--------------------------------------------------
Bound Off is seeking original literary fiction between 250 and 2500
words for their audio magazine. Payment is $20 per story.  You need
to submit your manuscript via the Bound Off Submishmash page - a
submission management system. For more detailed guidelines visit: 
http://boundoff.com/submit/?gclid=CNqI87Xz8rYCFRTMtAodO1AAyg

*****************************************************************

FEATURE:  How to Write the Perfect Road-Trip Article
=================================================================
By Barbara Weddle

For those of you who, like me, are lovers of the open road,
channeling your roadtripping adventures into road-trip articles is
only one short step (or mile) away.  Whether your road trip is to
the next county or clear across the country, telling others where
you've gone, what you've seen and done and how they might do the
same, can earn you money.  Just follow the suggestions below to
begin benefiting monetarily from your own road trips.  

What are road-trip articles? 
----------------------------
Road-trip articles are two- to three-page features that outline a
single- or multi-day journey taken by car, RV, or bike, describing
things to do and see along a particular route.  They can be as
ordinary as a Sunday drive near home or as extraordinary as a
weeks-long drive in some distant land.  They can be a themed
round-up of the best antique stores along Florida's I-95 coast or a
mish-mash of unrelated things to do and see.  They can be as short
as an eleven-mile loop in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park
or as long as a nearly-fifteen-hundred-mile drive along the Alaska
Highway.  In all instances, however, a good road-trip article lures
a traveler to the open road.    

Who can write one?
------------------
Anyone who has a love for the open road and has decent grammar and
writing skills.  

Where does one begin?
---------------------
Start with a road trip that is familiar to you.  You must have some
first-hand knowledge of the featured area or route you intend to
write about.  This doesn't mean that you have to drive the route on
a daily basis; obviously, if you're featuring a road trip you took
in Sierra Leone, you very likely will never drive it again (unless,
of course, you live there).  Having driven your proposed
road-trip-article route at least once, however, gives you a feel
for it that you'd not have otherwise.  

Also, choose a route that appeals to you personally; if you find a
particular route awe-inspiring, educational or just plain fun, it
is likely that others will also.  When I lived in Kentucky, I often
made a couple of back-and-forth drives between Midway and
Versailles just because I found the rolling landscape of the
aristocratic horse farms and the narrow winding Midway Road,
bordered by ageless oaks and blossoming red-bud in spring,
beautiful beyond belief.  

Choose a particular magazine to write FOR.  Using as a guide one or
more of the road-trip articles therein, pick them apart paragraph
by paragraph, sentence by sentence, word by word, paying special
attention to the magazine's tone, style, audience, mission and
editorial priorities.  For example, are stories told through
itinerary alone, or does the magazine require a little of the local
culture also?  Ask yourself what makes that particular magazine's
articles work.  Apply those strategies to your own article,
modifying it here, molding it there, to fit your own particular
style.  

A great idea is to obtain brochures, road maps, visitors' guides,
historical information, etc. from the  visitors' centers or
chambers of commerce of the area in which your road trip takes
place.  These will supply you with added information that you may
not have discovered during your online research or your actual
drive.  Study the printed materials thoroughly, concentrating on
those places that fit into your route, particularly those you
intend to use in your article.  Keep in mind, however, that it's
the little-known facts and destinations, found only by your
physical presence, that takes your article beyond just a "good"
road-trip article.         

What does a good road-trip article require?
-------------------------------------------
It must first inform travelers how to get to the place of origin. 
If the trip begins near Lexington, Kentucky, for example, travelers
from other locales should know what airport to arrive at and then
be given directions to the location where the road trip actually
begins.  Anchoring the start of your trip with an interesting town
or city, especially one with much to offer in the way of things to
see and do, is a good way to begin your road trip.   
 
A good road-trip article must have authenticity.  The article must
not only show that the writer is thoroughly familiar with the
itinerary, but that he is alert to its subtle nuances and those of 
the people along the route.  An author must hold the traveler's
hand.  An eye for strong images and the ability to commit those
images to paper is also essential.
 
Tell the reader how long a particular road trip is, both in mileage
and days; if the trip will take longer than one day, suggest what
hotel in what town travellers might spend the night or nights so as
to break up the trip into workable chunks.  

The article must give step-by-step or mile-by-mile directions in
which you highlight points of interest, eateries, shopping options,
hotels or B&Bs and other attractions or amenities along the route,
all woven seamlessly into the article along with evocative
descriptions of scenery and tidbits of local culture and history
(all depending upon the particular requirements of the publication
you're writing for, of course).  For example, you might mention
that a small Kentucky hamlet, included in the road trip, was sold
to the Lexington and Ohio Railroad Company in 1835, thus becoming
Kentucky's first railroad town.  Or, if writing a themed road-trip
article on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, you may want to include the
fact that 95% of the world's bourbon is produced in Kentucky
because Kentucky has the perfect mix of conditions and climate to
produce bourbon.
 
A basically lineal road-trip route is the norm; however, it may
occasionally digress slightly so that travelers can check out
something especially noteworthy away from the route.  Bear in mind,
however, that it's best that digressions be within approximately a
five-mile radius of the main route, give or take, and that precise
instructions for returning to the main route be given.  

A good road-trip article provides accurate information.  All
directions and locations must be precise: route numbers and names
of highways, etc., as well as cardinal points (. . . then double
back south into Arizona along U.S. 191 for 32 miles . . .) must be
dead on.  Times of tours, events, etc. should be coordinated with
itineraries so that travellers don't miss them. Fees for such 
events should be given as well as all other pertinent information. 
Misinformation on the part of the writer can disrupt or even ruin a
traveler's trip.  Finally, the article must be written clearly so
that the traveler will find the itinerary easy to read and
understand. 

Service information (often given as a sidebar) such as a printed
map of the route, what is new along the route, emergency
information, safety tips, handy apps to take along, tips on where
to get money-saving coupons for restaurants, hotels, entertainment,
etc., special items you might need to take along for extreme
environments, etc. are also essential.  Other information such as
back roads too narrow and winding for RVs, what type of vehicle to
consider for that rough drive in the mountains, warnings or safety
precautions such as road conditions, torrential rains, fire danger,
steep elevations, etc. are also helpful. 

The article must inform a traveler where to obtain further
information (chambers of commerce, web sites, welcome centers,
national- and state-park maps and/or ranger stations, etc.).

The article should include suggestions on the best time of year to
make the road trip. For example, a traveler would get more from a
trip to Kentucky in early or late spring during foaling season or
when the red bud (a small tree with purple-pink flowers) is in
bloom, or an event like Keeneland (horse racing) is taking place. 
Tell the reader when a particular location might be extremely hot
and humid or bitterly cold, so that the reader can plan travel
around personal comfort.  

What is a travel article without photos?  Take copious photos of
your road-trip itinerary; photos are usually required, and, in any
case, they make your article more salable.  [Editor's Note: If you
have not taken photos or find that they didn't turn out, consider
contacting those same chambers of commerce and tourism offices,
which can often supply photos for your piece at no charge.]

The completed article
---------------------
Ideally, you should drive your subject route one final time after
your article is completed but before you send it in.  This is the
time for you to verify locations, mileages, directions, etc. Do
route numbers, highway numbers, names of interstates still match
those given in your article?  Is that "down-home" little restaurant
still located in that rambling, wood-frame building in Keene,
population 80, or has it closed its doors?  Highway construction or
natural disturbances may have altered routes.  [Editor's Note: In
instances of construction, or when an attraction may be temporarily
closed for renovations, consider when your article will actually be
published.  In many cases, the repairs or construction may be
completed before the piece sees print, but it's always a good idea
to mention that an attraction is "scheduled" to reopen at a certain
time -- quite often, they don't.] If re-visiting your proposed
road-trip route is not possible, the skilled teams at the local
visitor's centers and chambers of commerce will be more than glad
to assist you in your verification process.  
 
Finally, keep copies of all your research and printed materials,
references, sources, notes, quotes.  An editor may ask you for
verification of something during the magazine's fact-checking
process.

>>--------------------------------------------------<<
Barbara Weddle has had travel articles and essays, book reviews,
service articles and personal essays published in more than 250
publications, including TRAVEL SMART, THE MISSOURI REVIEW, CHELSEA,
CHICAGO LIFE, WRITERS WRITE, THE WRITER and many more.

Copyright Barbara Weddle 2013  

Link to this article here: 
http://www.writing-world.com/travel/roadtrip.shtml
 
For more advice on writing travel articles visit:  
http://www.writing-world.com/travel/index.shtml
 
*****************************************************************

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FREE STUFF FOR WRITERS: Making a Book Trailer      
=================================================================
By Aline Lechaye

There are many ways to promote a new book. You can post
announcements about it on your social media site, hold a contest
and give away free copies of the book, allow readers to download
the Kindle version of your book for free for a certain period of
time, or write some blog posts about the book's characters or plot. 
Or, if you want to try something new, why not make a book trailer?

Many people nowadays would rather process information through
videos or podcasts rather than reading long blog posts or scrolling
through pages and pages of Twitter feeds or Facebook posts,
especially as there are so many other things in their lives
competing for attention. 

You may think that you need lots of sophisticated equipment or
software to make a book trailer (not to mention the know-how needed
to work said equipment or software), but actually -- thanks to
advances in technology -- making a book trailer may not be hard as
you think...

There's just something about watching someone draw that is
fascinating. Draw yourself a book trailer using Sparkol's
VideoScribe software (http://www.sparkol.com/videoscribe.php). What
is it? Basically, a fast motion video of a hand drawing complicated
images or writing slogans to music or a voiceover track. The
software runs on PCs and Macs, and the free trial version comes
with a handful of cute fonts, an image library, and a selection of
sounds to add to your video. The best feature is that you can
adjust the "camera view" as needed to make the video seem more
lifelike. There's a seven-day free trial for first-time VideoScribe
users. Check out some examples of videos made with the software at
http://www.youtube.com/user/VideoScribetv. 

When it comes to making videos, it doesn't get much simpler than
PhotoShow (http://www.photoshow.com). All you have to do is upload
some pictures -- the cover image of the book or fan art of the
characters, for example -- to the site (a limit of 20 MB per
picture, 50 MB per video for free accounts), choose the music,
captions, and speed you want for your video and then share the
resulting slideshow to your author blog or social media site. 

For making voiceover tracks -- or if you'd rather make a podcast
book trailer -- the best sound editing software is, without doubt,
Audacity (http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/). You can
record directly from your microphone and then add music or other
special effects simply by opening a parallel track underneath the
track that's already there. Highlight the sections of the track
that you don't want and hit delete on your keyboard to get rid of
them. Fade in or fade out tracks to create transaction effects. The
best feature of the software is the ability to magnify the sound
waves so that you can find the exact nanosecond of sound that you
want to edit. Audacity runs on PCs (even Windows 8 computers!),
Macs, and Linux computers. Finished files can be exported to a
variety of file types including mp3 or wma. 

By the way, here are six tips on how to make a book trailer from
Writer's Digest: 
http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/how-to-make-a-book-trailer-6-tips.


>>--------------------------------------------------<<

Copyright Aline Lechaye 2013
 
Aline Lechaye is a translator, writer, and writing tutor who
resides in Asia. She can be reached at alinelechaye at gmail.com

This article may not be reprinted without the written permission 
of the author. 

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THE WRITE SITES
=================================================================
International Society for Travel Writing
----------------------------------------
If you've been inspired by Barbara's article then check out this
information packed site.  It contains advice on becoming a travel
writer, information on where you can publish your work and much
more. 
http://istw-travel.org/resources.html

Education Writers' Association
------------------------------
For anyone thinking of writing about education or anyone who
already does this is an essential site to visit. It is free to join
and has all the information you need to get started as an
educational writer. 
http://www.ewa.org/site/PageServer?pagename=publications

Mystery Novel Writing Advice from Random House
-----------------------------------------------
If you want to write a mystery or crime novel you need to visit
this site to get some advice from PD James on how to do it. 
http://www.randomhouse.com/features/pdjames/mysterywriting.html

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AUTHOR'S BOOKSHELF: Books by Our Readers
=================================================================

Fiction: From Writing to Publication, by Vickie Britton

Full Circle, by Saul Silas Fathi

Jewels of the Sky, by Catherine E. McLean

Find these and more great books at
http://www.writing-world.com/books/index.shtml

Have you just had a book published?  If so, let our readers know: 
just click on the link below to list your book.
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Copyright 2013 Moira Allen









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