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                    W R I T I N G   W O R L D

A World of Writing Information - For Writers Around the World

                  http://www.writing-world.com

Issue 15:01            13,200 subscribers         January 2, 2015
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MANAGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION: See the bottom of this newsletter for
details on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.
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COPYRIGHT NOTICE: No material published in this newsletter may be
reprinted or posted without the consent of the author unless
otherwise noted. Unauthorized use is a copyright infringement.
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IN THIS ISSUE:
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EDITORIAL, by Moira Allen
     Look Both Ways Before Crossing (Off) the Year...
FEATURE ARTICLE, by Jennifer Brown Banks
     How to Master (and Survive) a Career as a Solo Writer!
NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR FEBRUARY 2015
PLUS: OPPORTUNITIES; NEWS FOR WRITERS; THE WRITE SITES 
                           
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THE TRUE LIFE STORY OF A NEW MEXICO MOM BURIED IN BILLS ...
Who Stumbled on the Secret of Making 6-Figures from Home as a
Writer! Click Here for Free Video
http://www.awaionline.com/go/index.php?ad=672737
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GET FEEDBACK AND ENTER WRITING CONTESTS AT FANSTORY.COM:
* FEEDBACK. Get feedback for every poem and story that you write.
* CONTESTS. Over 50 contests are always open and free to enter.
* FUN! Get feedback, enter writing contests, and learn.
http://www.fanstory.com
*****************************************************************
A WRITER'S YEAR is the ONLY 365-day planner designed specifically
for writers! Plan your schedule, track billable hours, organize
tasks, and track your progress and achievements.  Each week brings
you an inspirational writing quote.  Best of all, it's F*R*E*E!
Download an electronic version in PDF or Excel, or access the print
edition: http://www.writing-world.com/store/year/index.shtml
*****************************************************************
EVERY WRITER NEEDS A HOLIDAY!  "The Writer's Guide to Holidays, 
Observances and Awareness Dates" offers 1800 events worldwide --
Instant inspiration for those days when you can't think of anything
to write about!  Holiday topics are a favorite of editors, so fuel
your inspiration and jumpstart your articles today!  Available in 
print and Kindle editions; for more information visit
http://www.writing-world.com/store/year/holidays.shtml
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FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK - by Moira Allen
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Look Both Ways Before Crossing (Off) the Year...
------------------------------------------------

Tradition has it that the month of January was named for the Roman
god Janus, a god of beginnings and transitions.  Janus was
classically depicted as having two faces or heads, one facing
forward to the future, one looking backward at the past.  According
to Wikipedia, he was the god of "gates, doors, doorways, passages
and endings."  Whether the Romans actually associated him with this
month or not (Roman almanacs indicate that the patron of the month
may have been Juno), we've held onto this symbolism for the New
Year for centuries.

Despite a hearty round of Auld Lang Syne, however, we're more
likely to look forward than backward as we consider the year to
come.  We get caught up in making our resolutions, plans and goals
-- and are equally likely to get caught up in the cycle of
frustration that comes of adding the SAME resolutions and goals to
our list that we've added in years past.  So many things remain
undone, so many projects are unfinished, or worse, have not even
been  begun.  There's just so much to DO!

And so, as the last champagne is drunk, we're very likely to look
at the coming year as just one giant to-do list, a list that gets
longer rather than shorter as time goes by.  Resolutions and goals
from previous years, still unfinished, get tacked onto the new
projects and new goals of the coming year.  Things keep piling on
to the list, and very little seems to come off.  If you're like me,
you're probably looking at the months ahead and thinking, wow, I'm
going to be busier than ever!

There may not be anything we can do about our to-do lists for the
coming year.  But there is one thing we can change, and that is
"perspective."  There's a reason why Janus is depicted with two
faces.  In our focus on moving forward, on planning, on making
resolutions, on declaring that THIS is the year that we'll finally
do this and finish that, we forget that there is also, in this time
of new beginnings, the very important need to look backward as well.

In my household, we call it "looking back down the mountain."  (I
talked about this back in 2013 - you can read that editorial here:
http://www.writing-world.com/coffee/coffee71.shtml - but it seems a
good time to talk about it again.) During the year, we often feel
as if we're climbing a mountain, struggling ever higher, focusing
on this foothold and that achievement, always looking toward the
next step and the next task.  Periodically, my husband and I remind
each other that it's time to stop, take a deep breath, and look
back down the mountain.  Look at how far we've come.  Look at where
we are.  Look at the accomplishments that now lie behind us, rather
than the never-ending list of tasks that always lies ahead.

That seems to me to be a good plan for the beginning of the year. 
Before diving into that year-long to-do list and those endless
resolutions, take a moment to look back down your personal
mountain.  Take a look at how far you've come.  Take a look at what
you've done.  Gaze upon your achievements, not your task list. 
Remind yourself of what you HAVE accomplished -- and remind
yourself that it matters.

How many blog posts did you write in 2014?  How many articles?  How
many queries did you send out?  Did you finally write that short
story that you'd been thinking about for months?  Was this the year
you participated in NaNoWriMo?  (Never mind whether you completed
the novel -- rejoice that you signed up!)  Even if you can't point
to many completed projects, take a moment to acknowledge the many
steps you HAVE taken, in every area of life.  

Whatever you did in 2014, I'm betting that you worked  hard. 
You're probably going to work even harder in 2015.  Hard work can
be incredibly rewarding -- but only if you take the time to
recognize the work that you've done, and recognize, as well, the
rewards that you have reaped from it.  Without that recognition,
hard work becomes nothing more than drudgery -- with still MORE
drudgery ahead of you.

So take a moment, as the year begins, to take a deep breath and
look back down the mountain.  Look how far you've come.  Stop
thinking, for just a moment, about how far you feel you still have
to go.  Think, instead, about all the steps and accomplishments
that have brought you HERE, to the place where you are, right now,
today.  And then give yourself a pat on the back for a job well
done.

-- Moira Allen, Editor

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Copyright 2015 Moira Allen

This article may be reprinted provided the author's byline, bio and
copyright notice are retained. (For an author bio and complete
details on reprint terms, please visit 
http://www.writing-world.com/admin1/reprints.shtml)

Link to this article here:
http://www.writing-world.com/coffee/coffee89.shtml

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Read More About It... RELATED ARTICLES ON WRITING-WORLD.COM:

A New Year, a Blank Book... (Editorial for January 2014)
--------------------------------------------------------
Before I start asking myself what I WANT to do in 2014, I need to
ask one small, possibly uncomfortable question: What do I WISH I
had done in 2013? What plans did I make, one year ago, that I
didn't fulfill? What dreams did I have that never became reality?
What goals did I hope to achieve, but missed? In short, what is
about to get penciled onto my 2014 "to-do" list, because it DIDN'T
get done in 2013? 
(Read more at http://www.writing-world.com/coffee/coffee72.shtml)

New Beginnings, Again... (Editorial for January 2013)
-----------------------------------------------------
The problem with the word "finally" is that it suggests a process
that hasn't been final at all. We say "finally" in the hopes of
bringing to an end a succession of "finallies" that have never come
to pass. You don't say "finally" if you've been putting something
off for a week or two. You say it about something that you feel you
ought to have been doing for, quite possibly, years. In short, we
say "finally" not because a resolution is new, but because it is
old, and getting steadily older. And yet, for some reason, it still
hasn't gotten done...
(Read more at http://www.writing-world.com/coffee/coffee54.shtml)

Is It January Again? Eliminating Timewasters - January 2011) 
------------------------------------------------------------
This year, I'm not going to talk about resolutions. Instead, I'm
going to talk a bit about one of the things that often gets in the
way of achieving our resolutions: Timewasters. ...One of my
resolutions this year is to be a bit sharper in SPOTTING
timewasters, and a bit faster in eliminating them...
(Read more at http://www.writing-world.com/coffee/coffee26.shtml)

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NEW YEAR, OLD NEWSLETTER?
-------------------------
I know, I know... I did say that in 2015, I would look into
creating an HTML version of the newsletter.  And I have.  In fact,
this past week I have spent a great many hours "looking into,"
experimenting with, and tearing out chunks of hair over an HTML
version of this newsletter.  And you will doubtless observe that it
looks... well, pretty much like it always has!

I'm afraid that's the way it's going to stay.  I've concluded that,
in the "learning" stages, I could easily spend 5 or 6 hours (or
more) PER ISSUE just on format.  Once past that (assuming I ever
get past that), converting each issue to HTML is likely to require
at least 1-3 hours per issue.  That's in addition to the many hours
already spent putting each issue together, with no "newsletter
editor" to help out.

Folks, that's a lot of time just to make it "pretty."  So... I'm
going to settle for making it "good" and use those hours for more
productive purposes.  There seem to be fewer and fewer to spare as
the years fly by -- I don't spend that much time dressing myself up
these days either! :)

The other changes I spoke of are still in place.  Each issue will
be shorter; the first issue of the month will contain the feature
article and the contest listings, while the second will contain
Victoria Grossack's "Crafting Fabulous Fiction" and Aline Lechaye's
"Free Stuff for Writers" columns. 

Since many of you commented that you weren't aware of what is
available on the Writing-World.com website, I'm also adding a brief
list of "related articles" to accompany each feature.  My hope is
that this will guide you to more useful content on the web. 
Writing-World.com is a treasure-house of information -- more than
900 separate articles and columns! -- that can help you in just
about any area of writing.  Enjoy!
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VICTORIANA LOVERS: THE DECEMBER ISSUE OF VICTORIAN TIMES is now 
available! Christmas is over, but you can still savor the holiday 
season with an issue packed with Victorian holiday traditions: 
recipes, decorations, glimpses of how Victorians celebrated the 
season, even a special Christmas children's story from The Strand!
Visit http://www.mostly-victorian.com/VT/issues/VT-1412.shtml to
download the free electronic edition or access the print edition.
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OPPORTUNITIES FOR WRITERS
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Can't Get Enough of Game of Thrones?  Be Part of It!
----------------------------------------------------
If you're wild about Game of Thrones, you might want to consider
submitting something to the forthcoming "Game of Thrones
Compendium."  This will be "the world's first collaborative,
crowd-sourced compendium.  The end result will be a printed and
bound edition.  Every entry chosen for inclusion in the printed
book will receive a copy with their name listed as an author."
(Translation: No pay, folks.) The compendium is open to submissions
of artwork, photography, crafts, food, costumes, music and analysis
(presumably no poetry or fan fiction).  Submissions must relate to
events or storylines from seasons 1-4.  Anyone of the age of 18 or
over and living in the US and its territories and possessions, the
UK, Brazil, and Canada may submit. For more details, visit 
http://www.gameofthronescompendium.com
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PLOT WOES?  TIRED DIALOGUE? CHARACTERS GIVING YOU GRIEF? Do you 
struggle to keep your butt in the chair? Contact me through my 
website and let me know what's got you down; we'll brainstorm a 
way forward with a coaching regimen designed just for you!
Victoria-Lynn Winning, Writing Coach - http://vlawinning.ca

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FEATURE ARTICLE: How to Master (and Survive) a Career as a Solo
Writer!
by Jennifer Brown Banks

================================================================

"Two heads are better than one."---Anonymous

Read author's bios in an article's closure or in the intro of
best-selling books, and you'll find that the vast majority include
a reference to a spouse who served as a cheerleader, or editor, or
sounding board, or motivator, or muse, or hand-holder... In nearly
every book dedication, you'll find a word of thanks to the partner
who helped the writer pursue his/her dreams.

But what about the individuals for whom there is no "better half?" 

Consider the widow who discovers her passion for writing later in
life. The corporate ladder-climbing diva who moonlights as a
writer, who has yet to find her Prince Charming.  There's no one to
bounce ideas off in the middle of the night. No one to inspire
poetic thoughts. No second income to prevent this "starving artist"
from starving figuratively and literally.

Being a "solo act" as a writer is definitely more difficult and
less glamorous than other forms of artistry.  (And did I mention
there are no adoring groupies?) Consequently, a scribe who is
"unattached" or unmarried must be more strategic, committed, and
resourceful than his partnered peers.

Consider the following statistics, provided by the U.S. Census
Bureau:

* In 2012, there were 103 million unmarried U.S. citizens 18 and
above.

* In 2012, 53.6% of unmarried U.S. residents 18 and older were
women.

Additionally, changing norms, global travel and career aspirations
are causing many to postpone marriage.  Perhaps you're even one of
them.

If so, read on. While this article won't help you change your
marital status, it can change your writing status, and enable you,
as a solo act, to enjoy a more successful career with many encore
performances.  But, before we address how to approach a solo career
more strategically, let's examine a few reasons why single scribes
have different dynamics.

SOLO SCRIBES FREQUENTLY FALL INTO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES...

* They often have fewer creative options, in terms of turning down
low-paying clients, or projects that are uninteresting, due to a
lack of financial support.

* They must be very self-motivated, due to a lack of spiritual and
moral support often provided by a significant other.

* They must be effective time managers, in that their non-writing
responsibilities are not typically shared with a partner.

* They often must be more skilled at juggling and prioritizing, due
to holding down a 9 to 5 job (in addition to writing) for the
benefit of medical insurance that might otherwise be provided by a
spouse.  

Traditional advice for writers does not always apply to them; they
must know when and how to "adjust" to their needs and individual
lifestyles.    

LET'S LOOK AT WHAT A FEW WRITERS HAD TO SAY ABOUT HOW THEIR MARITAL
STATUS AFFECTED THEIR WRITING STATUS...

"My friends who have husbands who provide a home and insurance
don't feel the pressure I do, and never have to take projects they
don't like, because they're covered -- but they don't have the
freedom I do to take off on a research trip whenever I need to. So
both have advantages  but when it comes to ease, having someone
remove the burden of being the sole "bread winner" does make it
easier to focus on what one loves to write." ---Cynthia Clampitt,
President of Midwest Writers Association  

"I truly believe that if I hadn't been married to my husband, I
might not have been published. He was my biggest cheerleader and
critique partner. I went to my first writers conference because he
gave me a push (okay a shove)!"  ---Susan R., Novelist

"I have a relatively unique scenario in that I was "married but
single" when I started my freelance career. I lost my job as the
editor of a business newspaper when it folded in January 2003. My
husband had just been sent to Iraq for more than a year so I
figured, "If I can't make a freelance writing career now, I'll
never be able to do it." I had the financial advantage of his
income, but the schedule of a single woman. I could work until 2
a.m., eat on my own schedule and go days without leaving the house
if I wanted." ---Wendy B, Author, Editor, PR Executive  

"As someone who has been on both sides of the fence, I can attest
that "flying solo" is definitely harder on the psyche and the soul.
 When I was married, even though my husband didn't truly understand
my creative efforts, his income helped me to have less stress.
Stress can often lead to writer's block.  In writing, no output
means no income."  ---Elaine Cooke, Blogger and single mom  

The good news is that even with certain obstacles and limitations,
today's single scribe can learn to work smarter, not harder, and
build a successful business.  Even if you're not a solo act, the
following tips will help you to think more strategically and better
survive the rigors of freelance writing. 

INSURANCE 
---------
One of the biggest hardships for those who are single freelancers
is not having the benefit of insurance coverage through a spouse's
plan. Being without insurance is one of the worst "vulnerabilities"
for entrepreneurs. An accident, an unexpected illness, or other
life mishap could potentially devastate you financially.  If you're
currently uninsured, here are a few viable options to consider.

* Depending upon your age, A.A.R.P. provides various types of
insurance to people 50 years and older. For a membership fee of
only $16 a year, they offer an array of products for car, health
and life insurance coverage. For additional information, check out
their website: 
http://www.aarp.org/benefits-discounts/insurance-products/

* The National Writers Union offers writers dental and vision
insurance plans to defray the high cost of dental work, surgery,
eyewear and diagnostic tests.  

* If you're a homeowner, check your current policy provider. Many
times, you can get policies added on at a favorable rate, such as
business insurance, health insurance, and car insurance.

SUPPORT (spiritual and emotional)
---------------------------------
Living life as a single scribe can be a bit lonely and challenging.
 As mentioned above, those who are solo, often don't have the
benefit of having someone to share their dreams, bounce ideas off,
keep them motivated, help manage their business, or to serve as a
general cheerleader. Perhaps you're one of them.

Though these suggestions won't quite replace having a mate, they
can help you to feel supported, more "connected," and motivated to
go the distance.

* Join a local writers group in your area. The benefits? The
camaraderie and creative input of people who know some of the
trials and tribulations you're going through can be a real morale
booster. I have a group that I meet with once a month at our local
library.  It has been tremendously helpful in keeping me on task,
helping me to see the lighter side of writer's rejections, and
allowing me to see my creative work more objectively. Different
groups meet for different purposes. For example, some meet to
critique work, while others meet to network and share publishing
and writing job opportunities. Some are devoted to nonfiction,
while others focus upon other genres, like fiction or blogging.
Choose what works best for you based upon your individual needs and
writing level. Meetup.com is a fun site devoted to this purpose. 

* Expand your social horizons through social media. Cast a wide net
to people who may live in different regions but share the same
interests. It's a great way to network, collaborate on creative
projects, and build your business and your bottom line. A friend of
mine recently shared how Twitter has been instrumental in allowing
her to connect with some high-profile folks to land lucrative
interviews. She once interviewed singer Chaka Khan and the
legendary Maya Angelou.  

SUPPORT (financial)
-------------------
No matter what your vocation, having to survive off one income in
today's tough economy can seem next to impossible. With writers,
"the plot thickens." Many times publishers pay months after work is
completed. Online scams await the unwary writer, so that you may
not get paid for work performed at all. And who can forget the
"feast or famine" cycles?  It becomes crucial for writers to
develop other forms of income and opportunities.

Here are a few suggestions:

* If you're a blogger, make your site pay for the sweat equity and
time.  A simple task like placing a "donate to this site" button on
your blog can provide gas money, office supplies, or weekly
groceries, and tide you over until your next check.

* Got a great idea for a film, book, play, or other creative
project, but lack the finances to move forward?  KickStarter.com is
a popular platform that provides funding for various artistic
endeavors to make your dreams a reality (instead of a "dream
deferred").

* Remember never to put all your eggs in one basket. For example,
in addition to writing, I also teach writing classes online, set up
blogs for other writers, and have even been paid for poetry
recitals in my area. Take inventory and see what marketable skills
you have that would enhance your career and your bottom line.
 
Don't limit your creativity to your writing.  By following these
timely tips you'll meet the demands of today's "solo act" -- and
put a song in your heart, money in your bank account, and more
freedom in your freelancing choices.	 

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Jennifer Brown Banks is a veteran freelance writer, pro blogger,
and ghost writer. Her guest posts have been featured at "top-dog"
sites such as: Men with Pens, ProBlogger, Daily Blog Tips, and
Write to Done. Visit her site at http://Penandprosper.blogspot.com/.
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Copyright 2015 Jennifer Brown Banks

This article may not be reprinted without the author's written
permission.

Link to this article here:
http://www.writing-world.com/business/solo.shtml

=================================================================
Read More About It... RELATED ARTICLES ON WRITING-WORLD.COM:

One Dozen Unique Ways to Make More Money, by Patricia Fry
---------------------------------------------------------
Are you a working writer? Do you have strong time management and
marketing skills? Can you find enough work to support your writing
habit? Would you like to make even more money? Of course you would.
And you can! All you need is an awareness of the vast opportunities
out there for writers and the willingness to stretch and grow...
(Read more at http://www.writing-world.com/business/money.shtml)

Recession-Proof Your Writing Business, by Patricia L. Fry 
---------------------------------------------------------
What's a writer to do in times of economic struggle? The strategy
I've used over my 28 years as a freelance writer is to rethink and
reorganize my business. My motto is: if things aren't going your
way, find another way. Here are some ideas to help keep your
writing business afloat even during the hard times...
(Read more at http://www.writing-world.com/business/fry.shtml)

Twenty Ways Writers Can Save Money, by Mridu Khullar 
----------------------------------------------------
With today's financial see-saw tipping from one end to the other,
it's no wonder that writers often find themselves in a cash crunch.
But buying another writing book or springing for an expensive
two-day writing conference doesn't always have to pinch! Instead of
over-burdening yourself with deadlines you can't possibly meet,
think SAVING. Cutting small expenses can add up to hundreds of
dollars in savings. Here are 20 ways to cut out small expenses that
often go unnoticed...
(Read more at http://www.writing-world.com/business/save.shtml)

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FREE CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS
WritingCareer.com is a free online resource to find paying markets
for your poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Updated daily, we report
on current needs of editors and publishers who are open for
submissions, pay competitive rates, and do not charge reading fees.
http://www.writingcareer.com

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NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
================================================================= 

Britain's Prison Ban on Books Ruled Unlawful
--------------------------------------------
In a previous issue, we reported on Britain's ban on prisoners
receiving books (and other parcels) from outside sources.  The book
ban was introduced in November as part of a program restricting
what types of parcels prisoners could receive.  Instead, the
ability to order books from sources like Amazon.com became a
privilege that could be earned.  The ban fuelled considerable
outcry, and has now been lifted.  Prisoners argued that books sent
to them by friends and family could be key to their rehabilitation,
and Mr. Justice Collins said he could see "no good reason" to
restrict access to books.  He added that "in the light of the
statement made about the importance of books... to refer to them as
a privilege is strange."  The Prison Service counters that there
was never a specific ban on books, only on parcels.  For more
information, visit
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-30344867; to read a transcript of the
judgment, visit http://www.prisons.org.uk/book-ban.pdf

Cat Fancy and Dog Fancy Become Catster, Dogster
-----------------------------------------------
Fancy Publications, publisher of the largest collection of
pet-related publications, is no more; the company, and most of its
pet-related titles, are now owned by I-5 Media in Irvine,
California.  I-5 is now changing the titles of the company's
flagship magazines, Cat Fancy (founded in 1965) and Dog Fancy
(founded in 1970), to "Catster" and "Dogster."  Your intrepid
editor got her start as an editor at Dog Fancy!  The publications
are still a good place for new freelancers to get started.  For
more information, visit 
http://www.catchannel.com/cat-fancy/
http://www.dogchannel.com/dog-magazines/dogfancy/

Book Sales up in 2014
---------------------
Sales across all categories of book publishing were up 4.9% for the
first three quarters of 2014, according to the Association of
American Publishers.  The highest increase was in children's and
young adult books (22.4%), while adult fiction actually showed a
decrease (-3.3%).  In the children's/young adult category, ebooks
showed the largest growth, up 52.7% from the previous year.  For
more details, visit http://tinyurl.com/m9ukdnh

Author's Book Bumped from Kindle Because of Hyphens
---------------------------------------------------
Ever wonder if Amazon pays any attention to reader reviews?  They
do -- but apparently to the wrong things.  Graeme Reynolds was
informed by Amazon that his book, Moonstruck, had been temporarily
removed from the Kindle store because a reader had complained that
some of the words in the book were hyphenated.  Amazon informed the
author that "we have suppressed the book because of the combined
impact to customers."  The author pointed out that it was
grammatically correct to join words with hyphens (and, in fact,
quite often incorrect NOT to).  The author reluctantly set about
preparing a version without hyphenated words, and reports that the
book is now back online (though it's not clear whether it's back up
with or without the dreaded hyphens!).  For more on this, read
Reynold's blog at http://www.graemereynolds.com/

*****************************************************************
WRITING-WORLD.COM OFFERS UNIQUE GIFTS FOR WRITERS - AND READERS!
The holidays aren't the only time you need to find the perfect 
gift for a writer - or a book-lover - on your list.  So check out
Writing-World.com's unique line of custom-designed mugs - designed
by booklovers, for booklovers.  See our growing selection at
http://www.writing-world.com/store/mugs.shtml
*****************************************************************
WIN PRIZES FOR YOUR WRITING WITH THE LARGEST GUIDE TO WRITING 
CONTESTS, from Writing-World.com!  "Writing to Win" brings you 
more than 1600 contest listings from around the world.  You won't 
find a more comprehensive guide to writing contests anywhere.  
Available in print and Kindle editions from Amazon!
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1470025825/peregrine
*****************************************************************

NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR FEBRUARY 2015
================================================================= 
This section lists contests that charge no entry fees. Unless 
otherwise indicated, competitions are open to all adult writers. 

HART CRANE MEMORIAL POETRY AWARD
--------------------------------
DEADLINE: January 31 (originally February 1)
PRIZES: $100 
DETAILS: Submit 1 - 2 poems, any style, length or subject.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Dr. Noelle Bowles, Hart Crane Memorial Poetry Contest,
ICON, c/o Kent State University at Trumbull, 4314 Mahoning Ave.,
N.W. Warren, OH 44484
WEB: http://www.trumbull.kent.edu/academics/depts/arts/icon.cfm

NELSON ALGREN AWARDS
--------------------
DEADLINE: January 31 (originally February 1)
PRIZES: $3500, 4x $1000, 5x $500
DETAILS: Original fiction to 10,000 words. Open to legal residents
of the US. Submit no more than two entries.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, at http://www.algren.submittable.com
CONTACT: 2015 Nelson Algren Literary Awards, c/o Chicago Tribune,
435 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611
WEB: 
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/books/chi-2015-algren-award-rules-20141201-story.html#page=1

NFSPS COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY-LEVEL POETRY AWARDS
--------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: February - unspecified 
PRIZES: 2x $500, plus $300 stipend to attend conference
DETAILS: Edna Meudt Memorial Award and Florence Kahn Memorial
Award. Open to students of an accredited college/university. Up to
10 poems, max. 46 lines per poem, 50 characters per line.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Shirley Blackwell, Chair, P. O. Box 1352, Los Lunas, NM
87031, sonneteer@earthlink.net
WEB: http://www.nfsps.com/scholarship.htm

JIM BAEN MEMORIAL WRITING CONTEST
---------------------------------
DEADLINE: February 1
PRIZES: Publication and payment at normal professional rates
DETAILS: Write a short story of no more than 8,000 words, that
shows the near future (no more than about 50-60 years out) of
manned space exploration.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required, to
baen.nss.contest@gmail.com
WEB: http://www.baen.com/baenmemorialaward.asp

LEVIS READING PRIZE
-------------------
DEADLINE: February 1
PRIZES: $2,000 
DETAILS: Best first or second book of poetry (48 pages or more)
published in previous calendar year. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Levis Reading Prize, VCU Department of English, 900 Park
Avenue, Hibbs Hall, Room 306, P.O. Box 842005, Richmond, VA
23284-2005, detischc@mymail.vcu.edu  
WEB: http://english.vcu.edu/mfa/levis/

PATERSON POETRY PRIZE
---------------------
DEADLINE: February 1 
PRIZES: $1,000 
DETAILS: For a book of poems, 48+ pages, published the preceding
year with 500 copies or more.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Maria Mazziotti Gillan, Executive Director, Poetry Center,
Passaic County Community College, One College Blvd., Paterson, NJ
07505, mgillan@pccc.edu 
WEB: http://www.pccc.edu/home/cultural-affairs/poetry-center/prizes

LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA LITERARY AWARDS
-----------------------------------
DEADLINE: February 12
PRIZES: $3,000 and crystal trophy
DETAILS: Given to outstanding Virginia authors in the areas of
poetry, fiction, nonfiction (and, in the case of nonfiction, also
by any author about a Virginia subject), and literary lifetime
achievement. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No; nomination can be submitted online
but books must be submitted by  mail.
CONTACT: The Library of Virginia Literary Awards, 800 E. Broad St.,
Richmond, VA 23219
WEB: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/public/litawards/

CREATIVE WRITING STUDENT OUTSTANDING HAIKU CONTEST
--------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: February 15
PRIZES: $10 and publication
DETAILS: Open to US undergraduate/graduate creative writing majors.
Send 1-5 haiku (one per page).
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: The Aurorean, ATTN: CWSOHC, P.O. Box 187, Farmington, ME
04938
WEB: http://www.encirclepub.com/poetry/aurorean/contests

WRITERS' & ARTISTS' YEARBOOK 2015 SHORT STORY COMPETITION (UK)
--------------------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE:  February 15
PRIZE: 500, publication on website and tuition at an Arvon
Residential Writing Course worth 600.   
DETAILS:  Enter a short story (for adults) of no more than 2,000
words, on the theme of 'Joy'.  
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Email submissions to
competition@bloomsbury.com with "WAYB15 competition" as the subject
line.
WEB:  https://www.writersandartists.co.uk/competitions
  
COLLISION
---------
DEADLINE: February 18
PRIZES: Unspecified cash prizes and publication
DETAILS: Open to college undergraduates worldwide. Poetry: Send no
more than 5 poems. We consider all styles and forms,
experimentations, and imitations. Nonfiction: To 3000 words of
creative non-fiction prose. Again, we consider all styles and are
open to experimentative forms. Creative non-fiction prose includes
the personal essay, narrative, travel piece, and profile. Fiction:
To 3000 words. This can be in the form of short story, flash
fiction, experimental, etc. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required, to
collision.pitt@gmail.com
WEB:  http://collision.honorscollege.pitt.edu/guidelines.html

BBC NATIONAL SHORT STORY PRIZE (UK)
-----------------------------------
DEADLINE: February 25
PRIZES: 15,000, 3,000, 3x500, publication and radio broadcast
DETAILS:  The Award aims to promote the best in contemporary
British short fiction and has celebrated both established writers
and new stars over the last decade. The 2015 Award is open to UK
residents or nationals, aged 18 or over, who have a history of
publication in creative writing. Submit short story to 8000 words.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: bbcnssa@booktrust.org.uk 
WEB:  http://www.booktrust.org.uk/prizes/1/   

BBC YOUNG WRITERS' AWARD (UK)
-----------------------------
DEADLINE: February 25
PRIZES: Broadcast; mentoring; opportunity to meet with writing
professionals; tour of BBC studio
DETAILS: Young people aged 14 to 18, who live in the UK, are
invited to submit short stories of up to 1,000 words on any topic.
The judges will be looking for high-quality writing, stories that
demonstrate originality, imagination and creativity, and writers
who can capture the reader and hold their attention.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes; download and submit entry form,
then submit story to bbcywa@booktrust.org.uk
WEB: http://www.booktrust.org.uk/news-and-blogs/news/1294/

HSA BERNARD LIONEL EINBOND RENKU COMPETITION
--------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: February 28
PRIZE: Up to $150 and publication 
DETAILS:  The 2015 contest calls for 20-link nijin renga.
Entries must be written by two or more persons, each of whom
contributes a substantial number of individually authored stanzas.
Any particular author may appear in no more than three different
renku entered.  
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Bernard Lionel Einbond Renku Competition, c/o Sari
Grandstaff, 1457 Glasco Turnpike, Saugerties, NY 12477
WEB: http://www.hsa-haiku.org/hsa-contests.htm#einbond 
KELPIES PRIZE (SCOTLAND)
------------------------
DEADLINE: February 28
PRIZES: 2,000 and publication
DETAILS: For books from 40,000-70,000 words. Fantastic fantasies,
awesome adventures, and sensational sci-fi -- the Kelpies range of
Scottish children's novels has them all. But we are still looking
for more. Do you have a cracking story, with strong characters and
believable dialogue which children won't be able to put down?
Stories must set primarily in Scotland. New for 2015, we are now
accepting submissions in three categories: Young Kelpies (6-8
years), Kelpies (8-11 years) and KelpiesTeen (11-14 years).
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Floris Books, 15 Harrison Gardens, Edinburgh EH11 1SH,
SCOTLAND, floris@florisbooks.co.uk
WEB: http://www.florisbooks.co.uk/kelpiesprize/


MONTHLY/RECURRING COMPETITIONS:
===============================
The competitions below are offered monthly unless otherwise noted;
all require electronic submissions.

FANSTORY.COM
------------
PRIZES: $100 and other prizes
DETAILS: Various monthly fiction, nonfiction and poetry contests;
for some, you must become a member of the site.
WEB: http://www.fanstory.com/contests.jsp

THE NEXT BIG WRITER
-------------------
PRIZES: $100, $50, $25, plus review and membership
DETAILS: Must be a member. Competitions throughout the year,
including novels and flash fiction. 
WEB: http://www.thenextbigwriter.com/competition/index.html

PENN COVE LITERARY ARTS AWARD
-----------------------------
PRIZES: $50
DETAILS: Submit fiction, creative nonfiction, prose poetry, and
writing for children/young adults to 1,000 words. The first story
that "knocks the judges' socks off" each month is declared the
winner. Use the link below to access the submission page - that
page has links to the guidelines for submissions.
WEB: http://whidbeystudents.com/student-choice-contest/

SCRIBOPHILE WRITING CONTESTS
----------------------------
Bimonthly/Quarterly
PRIZES: $50 to $100 Amazon gift certificates
DETAILS: Short stories, flash fiction, poetry, on themes posted on
website.
WEB: http://www.scribophile.com/contests/ 

WRITER'S DIGEST YOUR STORY COMPETITION
--------------------------------------
Bimonthly
PRIZES: $100 in WD books
DETAILS: We'll provide a short, open-ended prompt. In turn, you'll
submit a short story of 750 words or fewer based on that prompt.
You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your
story. 
WEB: http://www.writersdigest.com/your-story-competition

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