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                    W R I T I N G   W O R L D

A World of Writing Information - For Writers Around the World

                  http://www.writing-world.com

Issue 15:03          13,300 subscribers          February 5, 2015
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MANAGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION: See the bottom of this newsletter for
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COPYRIGHT NOTICE: No material published in this newsletter may be
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otherwise noted. Unauthorized use is a copyright infringement.
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IN THIS ISSUE:
=================================================================

GUEST EDITORIAL, by Devyani Borade
     Are You a Happy Writer?
FEATURE ARTICLE, by Patricia Fry
     How to Become a Presenter at Prestigious Conferences
NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR MARCH
PLUS: NEWS FOR WRITERS 
                           
****************************************************************
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A WRITER'S YEAR is the ONLY 365-day planner designed specifically
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Download an electronic version in PDF or Excel, or access the print
edition: http://www.writing-world.com/store/year/index.shtml
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=================================================================

GUEST EDITORIAL - by Devyani Borade

=================================================================

Are You a Happy Writer?
-----------------------
I am a part-time writer. Unlike the author who says he is busy
writing a 400-page opus in the midst of two blog posts and a
feature-length article every day, I'm lucky if I can get four
sentences written down in four weeks. The only things I do manage
to write about are reminders for doctors' appointments and
kindergarten events.

I don't earn much money from writing. A hundred quid now, a couple
of them in six months' time just about keeps me in chocolate cake
and ice cream at every birthday.

I've never won an award. I've come close -- short-listed, honorable
mention -- but never actually won a blessed thing, though it's not
for lack of trying.

I'm not exactly beating off publishers with a stick either. In
fact, apart from the faint shadows of a nine-word plot, I don't
even have a proper solid idea for a book, let alone the next big
bestseller that everyone and their aunt would give up their gonads
for.

And although I have been published in several national magazines,
my byline doesn't grace the pages of the giants: no TIME or Forbes
has managed to sneak into my list of publishing credits.
	
Yet, I am perfectly content doing what I do.

Contentment comes with optimism. When we focus on the negatives, we
become negative. We start seeing EVERYTHING in a negative light.
And we simply open the door for more negativity to come into our
lives. When we focus on the positive, we make things happen to
realise that positivity. We consciously and subconsciously work
towards achieving that happy aim, and then we achieve it sooner or
later. 
	
I'm happy when I write, but I don't think of writing when I'm happy.

Writing occasionally doesn't make me any less serious a writer. It
doesn't make me an overly complacent one either. Or any less
professional, less competent, less ambitious, or even less
successful! Sure, I'd like to see a few million hardbacks with my
name on them. Sure, I'd like to see my bank balance swell up in
exponents of ten every month. But I am not frustrated that this
isn't the case in my life AT THIS TIME. I can choose to get
depressed and envious about all the other richer and busier writers
out there. Or I can choose to accept that I am richer and busier in
OTHER aspects of my life. I can celebrate how far I have come, how
I have improved upon myself and how I have become successful at
what I have chosen to do.

And I achieve this happiness in the following ways. You can, too.

1. Believe in yourself.
----------------------- 
I'm a confident writer. Not for me the insecurities of wondering
whether I am any good at writing or whether my time would be better
spent at doing something else, like cleaning the streets maybe. No,
those niggles pretty much vanished around the time I sold my fifth
article and realized that I was on to a good thing with "this
writing lark." And that it wasn't beginner's luck either. I know I
am good, I know exactly what I am good at. Humorous vignettes with
word-play? Nobody better. Historical western romances? Don't even
think about it. I know where I suc-ceed, and where I plain suck.

2. Break some rules.
--------------------
I'm a rebellious writer. Remember that little gem you were taught
about submitting your manuscript only when it was word-perfect? As
the old Chinese proverb goes: poppycock. If every writer were
beholden to this rule, no one would ever get around to submitting
and publishing anything at all. A writer needs to begin submitting
and marketing early and often. It doesn't matter if the manuscript
is only in its second draft. Unless you pitch somewhere, you won't
know just how good or bad you are. But you need to also be sensible
about it. The important things to keep in mind are: a) Don't pitch
to your top ten publishers that you eventually intend to sell the
work to, and b) Pitch to people who are more likely to give you
feedback, so that you can use it to revise and strengthen the work.
Similarly, write what you like, not necessarily what others want to
read. Your passion will ensure that you write, and write, and
continue writing. Inevitably, the more you write, the better you
will get at it and the easier it will then become to write what
readers want to read, even if it is just for the sake of getting
that prestigious assignment or pay for that extra hour of childcare.

3. Know what you want. And then get it.
---------------------------------------
I am a principled writer. I have some thumb rules that I never
break, no matter how good the pay-back is. One of them is always
being honest in working with editors and publishers, even if this
means selecting a lower-paying market or returning an overpayment.
Another is not settling for less than what my work is worth. I've
walked away from more deals than I've published articles, because
the terms were of absolutely no use to me. While the loss of income
may pinch initially, you learn what is important to you and then
seek out all the information and help you can to get it. Like to
write an autobiography? Read some, then take a class. Looking for
SEO writing opportunities? Crawl the Internet and subscribe to a
dozen market newsletters and job boards. The very act of doing
something towards your goal reinforces the goal and is a step in
the right direction. 

You don't have to be perfect. Just perfect FOR YOURSELF. You can
achieve this personal perfection by having your own yardstick of
what success means to you. But the important thing is that the
yardstick have notches that take into account successes that are
big as well as small. Think that writer who sold several thousand
copies on Kindle is successful? Great. But if your own pdf has been
downloaded 67 times, that is no small feat either. Imagine, at
least 67 people in the world have thought your words worth paying
their hard-earned cash for. And at least 67 people in the world
have benefited in some way from your creation. To me, that sounds
good.
	
So, full-time or part-time, business-minded or pleasure-finder,
whatever type of writer you are, be happy with what you're doing.
When we are reconciled with our past we free our minds to embrace
our future.
	
And for now, Donald Trump can heave a sigh of relief.

=================================================================

Devyani Borade is a professional writer. She writes on the humour
and pathos of everyday life. Her fiction, nonfiction and art have
appeared in magazines across the world. She likes to eat
chocolates, read comic books and try her husband's patience!
Contact her on v3rbolatry(at)gmail(dot)com for assignments,
comments or just to say hello. She doesn't bite, promise.  Find out
more at her blog "Verbolatry" at http://devyaniborade.blogspot.com/

=================================================================

Copyright 2015 Devyani Borade

This article may not be reprinted without the author's written
permission.

Link to this article here:
http://www.writing-world.com/life/happy.shtml

=================================================================
VICTORIANA LOVERS:
------------------
THE FEBRUARY ISSUE OF VICTORIAN TIMES is now available! This month,
get a special peek at Victorian valentines, read more of E.
Nesbit's childhood reminiscences, discover curious "house-mottoes,"
and find out first-hand what it was like to be a working girl in
the Victorian shop or factory. Plus loads of recipes, household
hints and more.   
Visit http://www.VictorianVoices.net/VT/issues/VT-1502.shtml to
download the free electronic edition or access the print edition.
=================================================================

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FEATURE ARTICLE: 
How to Become a Presenter at Prestigious Conferences
By Patricia Fry

================================================================

As you may know, conferences are held in many locations world-wide
on numerous topics including travel, arts and crafts, writing,
publishing, computer technology, agriculture, ecology, animals,
photography, health, real estate, finance, business management,
education, sports, spirituality, paranormal and more.

A conference might be a one-day event or run for ten days. Most are
two- and three-day events, usually over a weekend. Conferences
generally consist of anywhere from 5 to 35 (or more) workshops
running throughout the duration of the event. Often, they'll have
two or three (sometimes more) sessions running simultaneously. At
some point during the conference, everyone will come together to
hear the keynote speaker -- generally in conjunction with a formal
dinner. Sometimes the keynote address is given early on the first
day of the conference as an opening to the event.

People attend conferences in order to gain more knowledge,
information and resources on a particular topic. Typically, during
the day, attendees sit in on presentations and workshops by
professionals, experts and others with experience in various
aspects of the topic or field. There are often casual mixers and/or
elegant dinners in the evening, sometimes accompanied by an awards
program or an entertaining keynote address. There is generally a
bookstore set up where attendees can purchase books by the speakers
and workshop leaders. As an alternative, speakers may be provided
with a signing table separate from the bookstore for an hour or so
after their presentations.

If you have written a nonfiction how-to, informational or reference
book, you may be considered an expert -- or at least very
knowledgeable -- on that topic, and you may be able to get a
speaking gig at an appropriate conference. If you hope to do more
than one or two conferences per year, you will probably be required
to do some traveling.

Why Speak at Conferences?
-------------------------
Why should you pursue the opportunity to speak at conferences on
topics related to your book? Because this is where you'll find your
audience. If you have a book featuring tips and resources for
artists and crafters who want to sell their work, many of your
readers might gather at a conference on the business of arts and
crafts. Maybe your book is a primer for families who want to go
green or a step-by-step guide to installing solar power. You might
find your audience at conferences related to green living.

Being a writer, you are probably already familiar with writers'
conferences. Perhaps you've attended a few of them. If you are
promoting a novel, you may be inclined to seek speaking
opportunities within these familiar territories.

You may recall listening to novelists speak at writers conferences
on character development, how to promote a novel, writing a
dynamite opening, tips for a more descriptive way of writing, how
to show and not tell, how to use dialog and so forth. You've
probably heard novelists talk about their writing journeys. I sat
in on a session with a former police officer once who talked about
how to accurately describe the appropriate guns and ammo one could
use in their stories. I enjoyed a presentation at a conference not
too long ago where a novelist shared her research techniques. 

But don't stop at conferences for writers. Look farther for
opportunities that fit with the content of your book. Sandra
Beckwith often speaks at conferences. She says, "My book,
'Publicity for Nonprofits,' was published in 2006. During the first
18 months after the book came out, I spoke at several national and
regional conferences. This was no coincidence; I submitted many
proposals to appropriate organizations well in advance of the
book's release and did a few teleseminars, as well. I was paid for
all of them with the exception of one teleseminar, which led to a
follow-up in-person paid speaking gig for the organization. I
earned almost as much in speaking fees for that book as I did for
the advance."

QiGong expert Victoria Cobb says, "Last summer I was invited to
teach at a retreat in Michigan. It is a wonderful long-running,
spiritual retreat. For over 40 years, these like-minded people have
gathered. There are many classes and about 300 people who attend. I
was their energy teacher and one of many massage therapists.

"I sold books and DVDs in the bookstore and made bottles of flower
remedies, gave massages and taught what I have learned as a
student, teacher and healer. This was a remarkable and memorable
event! Last year at the event I sold 25 DVDs, 53 books and all 30
remedies. I have been invited back for this July... a rare thing
since no one has ever been invited twice in a row."

Getting a Gig
-------------
So how do you land a speaking gig at the conferences of your choice?

Nancy Barnes presents workshops and speaks on how to write your
life story or memoir.

She says, "It's easy to research conferences now that their
information is all online. When I started out I wanted to establish
myself as a speaker, so I 'paid my dues' by renting an exhibit
booth at an expo. While I was there, I closely examined the expo
program and dropped in to watch many other speakers. Then I put
together a better presentation -- a better PowerPoint, a livelier
description, and a great title -- one that ensured that the expo
organizers allowed me to speak at the next conference. (Since
they'd met me already as a paying exhibitor, they were inclined to
give me a chance.) Once I had my foot in the door at that expo, it
gave me credibility when I applied to speak at other events. Now I
keep a spreadsheet of ten conferences, and about ten book
festivals, with dates a year and a half out, and I monitor their
application deadlines using Google alerts to be sure I'm applying
for each one."

Here are some ways to get started:

* Research conferences in your field and in your region and select
a few. (See links to conference directories below.)

* Do a Google search to locate conferences in specific areas. Use
keywords such as  "health conference Nashville" or "pet events New
York."

* If at all possible, attend a couple of conferences to find out
what sort of programs they present. You can do this while you are
compiling or writing your book and receive the added benefit of
additional knowledge and perspective in your field or genre. (A
small conference might cost around $50 to $100 for the weekend. A
more prestigious, longer-running one might come with a fee of $800
or more, depending on what they offer. If you're not ready to be a
presenter, but you want to attend in order to learn, consider
asking for a volunteer position.)

* Study the list of programs and workshops at conference websites.
What topics are covered? What could you bring to the table for this
audience that relates to your book?

* Create a handful of unique, yet potentially popular programs you
could present to your particular audience. Certainly, you could
recycle some of your former presentations.

* Contact the organizers per the requirements at their websites. If
there are no submission guidelines at the website, simply introduce
yourself and your potential programs through an email to the
appropriate person. Include a brief bio and ask them to contact you
for additional information and/or an invitation to speak.

Move Quickly
------------
When I locate an event of interest, I study the information
presented at the website and, if it seems appropriate, I submit a
proposal or I send an email of introduction, based on their
submission guidelines. If there are no guidelines posted, I will
email or call the director and ask how to apply to be a speaker or
a workshop leader. I have a resume prepared listing my
qualifications as an industry professional and as an author of
books in this field as well as a speaker, and I'm always ready to
make workshop or speech topic suggestions.

While some conference organizers are still selecting speakers a
month prior to the event, many of them have their programs set
practically a year in advance. I've discovered that if you want a
speaking gig at a particular conference, you'd better be proactive.
Early in 2011, I contacted the director of a writers' conference I
wanted to participate in. She told me, "Contact us in October."
When I did, I was told that all of the speaking slots were filled
and the event wasn't until spring. In this case, I should have
checked in earlier than I was told to.

Here's what I recommend: Research conferences that occurred one to
four months ago. Contact the organizers of those events. If they
suggest you reconnect in six or seven months, make a note on your
calendar to contact them in three. They may put you off for another
three months, but that's okay -- they know you are interested.
Besides, there is always a chance that they are beginning to
interview possible speakers for their program next year.

So what can a conference presenter expect as far as expenses and
fees? There are nearly as many scenarios as there are conferences
across the United States. Some conference organizers are authorized
to pay all expenses for their presenters. Some pay for your hotel
stay, all meals associated with the conference and free admittance
to the conference. Others may give you the conference admission and
meals only and pay you a small stipend.

Is it worth it?  Margaret Brownley speaks successfully at
conferences and has developed a fairly versatile repertoire. She
says, "I gear my talks toward the audience. Writers like 'how to'
information and readers enjoy an entertaining look at the life of a
writer. Since I write westerns, I also give talks on women of the
old west. I've spoken at the Romance Writers of America and
American Christian Fiction Writers national conferences. Even
though the audiences are mostly writers, my novels sell out at
conference bookstores."  What more could you ask?

=================================================================

Patricia L. Fry has been writing for publication for over 30 years,
having contributed hundreds of articles to about 250 different
magazines and e-zines. She is the author of 25 books including Talk
Up Your Book, A Writer's Guide to Magazine Articles for Book
Promotion and Profit and The Right Way to Write, Publish and Sell
Your Book (Matilija Press). For more inspiration, information and
resources from Patricia Fry, follow her blog at 
http://www.matilijapress.com/publishingblog/.

=================================================================

Copyright 2012, 2015 Patricia Fry
(Excerpted from Talk Up Your Book, Allworth Press, 2012)

This article may not be reprinted without the author's written
permission.

Link to this article here:
http://www.writing-world.com/promotion/gigs.shtml

*****************************************************************
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NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
================================================================= 

US Department of Education gets "Incomplete" on Plain Language
--------------------------------------------------------------
In 2010, the "Plain Writing Act of 2010" was put in place to cut
down the babble of bureaucrat-speak and make public documents
easier to understand.  Each year, the Center for Plain Language
(CPL) examines public documents provided by government agencies to
determine how well the agency is complying with the Act.  In 2014,
agencies were rated not only on compliance (whether the agency has
measures in place to help meet the requirements of the act), but
also on the quality of the writing itself, and on information
design (how effectively the information is presented to the
public).  The agencies that scored the lowest were the Department
of the Interior (F for compliance, Incomplete in writing and
information design), and the Department of Education (D for
compliance, C in writing and B in information design).  In 2015,
things may get even more interesting, as the CPL will be selecting
the documents to test rather than allowing the agencies to submit
their own.  "We'll focus on documents that are... key to an
agency's mission as far as the public is concerned," says CPL
volunteer Annetta Cheek.  For more on this story, visit 
http://tinyurl.com/ks8qmug

PaperBackSwap to Charge Membership Fee
--------------------------------------
If you love books, you may be familiar with the PaperBackSwap
website, where members could "swap" books for nothing more than the
cost of postage.  Members post the books they want to get rid of,
getting credits for every book that they send to another member,
which they can then use to obtain books for themselves.  For
several years the service has been free, but beginning February 15,
the site will begin charging annual membership fees or per-swap
fees.  Members will have a choice between a premium membership at
$20 (unlimited swaps), a basic membership of $12 (30 swaps per
year), or 49 cents per swap if they prefer not to subscribe. 
Membership fees also come with a 50-cent "transaction" fee.  Oddly,
there's still no mention of this on the home page of the site
(existing members were informed of the change by e-mail) - find out
more at https://secure.paperbackswap.com/kiosk/primo_pricing.php

SFWA Changes Membership Requirements
------------------------------------
For years, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America
(SFWA) has denied active membership status to self-published and
small-press-published authors.  In March, that will change.  In a
recent referendum, the organization voted to accept members who
have been self-published, electronically published, published by
small/indie presses, and so forth.  The criteria for acceptance as
an Active Member will now be based solely on revenues.  The basic
standards are $3000 for a novel, or a total of 10,000 words of
short fiction paid at 6 cents per word.  Associate Members must
have published a story of at least 1000 words at 6 cents per word. 
Self-published and small-press works were already eligible for
Nebula and Norton Awards.  Complete details of the change will be
posted at the SFWA website by March 1 - visit http://www.sfwa.org
for details.

*****************************************************************
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NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR MARCH
================================================================= 
This section lists contests that charge no entry fees. Unless 
otherwise indicated, competitions are open to all adult writers. 

MILTON KESSLER POETRY BOOK AWARD
--------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 1 
PRIZES: $1,000
DETAILS: Poetry book of 48+ pages by an author aged 40+, published
in the previous year with a minimum print run of 500 copies. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Maria Mazziotti Gillan, Director, Creative Writing
Program, Binghamton University, Department of English, General
Literature, and Rhetoric, Library North Room 1149, Vestal Parkway
East, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
WEB: 
http://www2.binghamton.edu/english/creative-writing/binghamton-center-for-writers/binghamton-book-awards/kessler-guidelines.html 

NAOMI LONG MADGETT POETRY AWARD
-------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 1 
PRIZES: $500 and publication
DETAILS: Open to African American poets. Submit mss. of 60-90
pages, each poem on a new page.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: BROADSIDE LOTUS PRESS, ATTN: Gloria House, 8300 East
Jefferson Avenue - #504, Detroit, MI 48214, broadsidelotus@gmail.com
WEB: http://www.lotuspress.org/

CREATIVE WRITING FOR SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (IRELAND)
--------------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 2
PRIZES: €200 in total prizes
DETAILS: Two youth categories: 14 years and under, and 18 years and
under; submit poem or short story.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Writers' Week Creative Writing for Special Educational
Needs, Literary Competitions, Writers' Week Limited, 24 The Square,
Listowel, Co. Kerry, IRELAND, info@writersweek.ie
WEB: http://writersweek.ie/competition

KERRY COUNTY COUNCIL CREATIVE WRITING 
FOR YOUTH COMPETITIONS (IRELAND)
--------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 2
PRIZES: €1,500 in total prizes
DETAILS: Creative writing categories for five different youth age
brackets - submissions may be stories, poems or essays, plus a
limerick category for all youth age categories.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Writers' Week Kerry County Council Creative Writing for
Youth Competitions, Literary Competitions, Writers' Week Limited,
24 The Square, Listowel, Co. Kerry, IRELAND, info@writersweek.ie
WEB: http://writersweek.ie/competition

THE NILSSON LOCAL HERITAGE COMPETITION (IRELAND)
------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 2
PRIZES: €750
DETAILS: Submit two copies of a published book on Local Heritage
(presumably Irish).  Not specified whether this competition is open
to writers outside of Ireland.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Writers' Week Nilsson Local Heritage Competition, Literary
Competitions, Writers' Week Limited, 24 The Square, Listowel, Co.
Kerry, IRELAND, info@writersweek.ie
WEB: http://writersweek.ie/competition

RBC BRONWEN WALLACE AWARD FOR EMERGING WRITERS (CANADA)
------------------------------------------------------- 
DEADLINE: March 2
PRIZES: CDN $5,000; 2x $1,000
DETAILS: This award alternates each year between short fiction and
poetry. The 2015 prize will be given for an outstanding work of
poetry. Given to a writer below the age of 35 who has published
poetry or prose in literary magazines, journals, or anthologies,
but has not yet been published in book form. Open to Canadian
citizens or permanent residents. Submit 5-10 pages of unpublished
poetry.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: Amanda Hopkins, Program Coordinator, RBC Bronwen Wallace
Award for Emerging Writers, The Writer’s Trust of Canada, 90
Richmond St. E., Suite 200, Toronto, ON M5C 1P1, CANADA,
ahopkins@writerstrust.com
WEB: 
http://www.writerstrust.com/Awards/RBC-Bronwen-Wallace-Award-for-Emerging-Writers/Prize-Guidelines.aspx

JANE MARTIN POETRY PRIZE (UK)
-----------------------------
DEADLINE: March 6
PRIZE: £700 and the chance to give reading at Girton College,
Cambridge. 
DETAILS: The competition is open to all UK residents between 18 and
30 years of age. Submit 1-4 poems, maximum 4 single-spaced A4
pages, on any theme and in any style.  
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required, to 
http://app.casc.cam.ac.uk/fas_live/jmp.aspx 
CONTACT: poetryprize@girton.cam.ac.uk
URL: http://www.girton.cam.ac.uk/jane-martin-poetry-prize 

NEA LITERARY FELLOWSHIPS
------------------------
DEADLINE: March 11
PRIZES: $25,000 
DETAILS: The NEA Literature Fellowships program offers grants in
prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published
creative writers that enable the recipients to set aside time for
writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. The NEA
Literature Fellowships program operates on a two-year cycle with
fellowships in prose and poetry available in alternating years.
Grants in 2015 are for prose. See website for eligibility.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
CONTACT: NEA, 400 7th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20506,
LitFellowships@arts.gov
WEB: http://arts.gov/grants-individuals/creative-writing-fellowships

IT'S ALL WRITE SHORT STORY WRITING CONTEST FOR TEENS
----------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE:  March 13
PRIZES: $200, $150, $100 and publication online and in a booklet.   
DETAILS: The "It's All Write!" Teen Short Story Contest is an
annual event sponsored by the Ann Arbor District Library that
invites teens to enter their short stories for review. Short
stories are judged in three different categories: Grades 6-8,
Grades 9 & 10, and Grades 11 & 12. Any theme, submit one story of
between 4 and 8 pages.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required 
CONTACT: Kayla, allwrite@aadl.org
WEB:   http://www.aadl.org/events/itsallwrite

BINNACLE ULTRA-SHORT COMPETITION
--------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 15
PRIZES: $300 in prizes; minimum $50 
DETAILS: Prose works of 150 words or fewer and poetry of 16 lines
or fewer and fewer than 150 words.  All works should have a
narrative element to them.  Submit no more than two entries.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required, to ummbinnacle@maine.edu
WEB: http://machias.edu/ultra-short-competition.html

EXPATRIATE TRAVEL WRITING CONTEST
---------------------------------
DEADLINE:  March 15
PRIZES: $500, $150, $100 and publication online
DETAILS:  Submit an original unpublished essay of between 1,000 and
3,000 words relating to your experience living, moving, or working
abroad. Focus should be placed on a description of the experience
abroad and not primarily on personal feelings, as the descriptions
and perceptions of the author should imply the personal impact.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required, to 
expatriatewritingcontest@transitionsabroad.com
WEB: 
http://www.transitionsabroad.com/information/writers/expatriate_writing_contest.shtml#expatriate_guidelines

PATERSON PRIZE FOR BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
-----------------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 15 
PRIZES: $500 in three categories
DETAILS: For books published in preceding year for: Pre-K to Grade
3, Grades 4-6, Grades 7-12.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Maria Mazziotti Gillan, Executive Director, Poetry Center,
Passaic County Community College, One College Blvd., Paterson, NJ
07505, mgillan@pccc.edu 
WEB: http://www.pccc.edu/home/cultural-affairs/poetry-center/prizes

THREE CHEERS AND A TIGER MYSTERY CONTEST
----------------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 20 (held the weekend closest to March 21)
PRIZES: Amazon gift cards; 1st place is $35-$50 depending on # of
entries
DETAILS: A 48-hour story contest; entries must be posted within the
contest time-frame. The theme and word-count will be provided at
the opening of the contest.  
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
E-MAIL: threecheers14@toasted-cheese.com (for entries)
WEBSITE: http://tclj.toasted-cheese.com/contest-guidelines/

ERIC HOFFER AWARD FOR PROSE
---------------------------
QUARTERLY: March 30, June 30, September 30, December 31
PRIZES: $250
DETAILS: Open to short works of fiction and creative nonfiction, to
10,000 words, unpublished (do not submit if published online).
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
CONTACT: The Eric Hoffer Award, P.O. Box 11, Titusville, NJ 08560,
info@hofferaward.com
WEB: http://www.hofferaward.com/HAprose.html

BEVEL SUMMERS SHORT STORY PRIZE
-------------------------------
DEADLINE:  March 31
PRIZES: $1000 and publication in Shenandoah magazine
DETAILS: Each submission should include work from only one genre.
Submit 3 to 5 poems; prose submissions should not exceed 20 pages;
no more than four short shorts per submission.   
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No 
CONTACT: Shenandoah, Washington & Lee University, Lexington, VA
24450, Shenandoah@wlu.edu 
URL:  http://shenandoahliterary.org/submissions/

FOLEY POETRY AWARD
------------------
DEADLINE: March 31
PRIZES: $1,000
DETAILS: "America is a smart, Catholic take on faith and culture,
the leading provider of editorial content for thinking Catholics
and those who want to know what Catholics are thinking." Submit one
unpublished poem of 30 lines or fewer that is not under
consideration elsewhere.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Foley Poetry Contest, America Magazine, 106 West 56th
Street, New York, NY 10019
WEB: http://americamagazine.org/foley-poetry

L. RON HUBBARD'S WRITERS OF THE FUTURE CONTEST
----------------------------------------------
QUARTERLY: December 31, March 31, June 30, September 30
PRIZES: $1,000, $750, $500, plus $5,000 grand prize for best story
of year
DETAILS: Fantasy, Sci-Fi or Horror: All types of science fiction,
fantasy and horror with fantastic elements, 17,000 words max. Open
only to those who have not had professionally published a novel or
short novel, or more than one novelette, or more than three short
stories, in any medium. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: Writers of the Future Contest, P.O. Box 1630, Los Angeles,
CA 90072
WEB: http://www.writersofthefuture.com/contest-rules-writers/

MILDRED KANTERMAN MEMORIAL MERIT BOOK AWARDS
--------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: March 31 
PRIZES: $500, $100, $50
DETAILS: For books published in preceding year. At least 50 percent
of the book must be haiku, senryu, or haibun, or prose about these
subjects (books mostly of tanka, for example, are not eligible). 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Mike Montreuil, First Vice President, HAS, 1409 Bortolotti
Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario K1B 5C1, Canada,
mikemontreuil@sympatico.ca
WEB: http://www.hsa-haiku.org/hsa-contests.htm#meritbook

MONTHLY/RECURRING COMPETITIONS:
===============================
The competitions below are offered monthly unless otherwise noted;
all require electronic submissions.

FANSTORY.COM
------------
PRIZES: $100 and other prizes
DETAILS: Various monthly fiction, nonfiction and poetry contests;
for some, you must become a member of the site.
WEBSITE: http://www.fanstory.com/contests.jsp

THE NEXT BIG WRITER
-------------------
PRIZES: $100, $50, $25, plus review and membership
DETAILS: Must be a member. Competitions throughout the year,
including novels and flash fiction. 
WEBSITE: http://www.thenextbigwriter.com/competition/index.html

PENN COVE LITERARY ARTS AWARD
-----------------------------
PRIZES: $50
DETAILS: Submit fiction, creative nonfiction, prose poetry, and
writing for children/young adults to 1,000 words. The first story
that "knocks the judges' socks off" each month is declared the
winner. Use the link below to access the submission page - that
page has links to the guidelines for submissions.
WEBSITE: http://whidbeystudents.com/student-choice-contest/

SCRIBOPHILE WRITING CONTESTS
----------------------------
Bimonthly/Quarterly
PRIZES: $50 to $100 Amazon gift certificates
DETAILS: Short stories, flash fiction, poetry, on themes posted on
website.
WEBSITE: http://www.scribophile.com/contests/ 

WRITER'S DIGEST YOUR STORY COMPETITION
--------------------------------------
Bimonthly
PRIZES: $100 in WD books
DETAILS: We'll provide a short, open-ended prompt. In turn, you'll
submit a short story of 750 words or fewer based on that prompt.
You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your
story. 
WEBSITE: http://www.writersdigest.com/your-story-competition

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