Writing World Newsletter Archive
Return to Newsletter Index · Home


******************************************************************

                    W R I T I N G   W O R L D

A World of Writing Information - For Writers Around the World

                  http://www.writing-world.com

Issue 15:09             13,371 subscribers            May 7, 2015
*****************************************************************
MANAGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION: See the bottom of this newsletter for
details on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.
*****************************************************************
COPYRIGHT NOTICE: No material published in this newsletter may be
reprinted or posted without the consent of the author unless
otherwise noted. Unauthorized use is a copyright infringement.
*****************************************************************
IN THIS ISSUE:
=================================================================

GUEST EDITORIAL, by Victoria Grossack
     Improve Your Ability to Concentrate
FEATURE ARTICLE, by Maria Chatzi
     What To Do When You Believe an Editor Is Wrong
NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR JUNE
PLUS: NEWS FOR WRITERS 
                           
****************************************************************
EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FREELANCE FEES! Learn how to 
choose the best pricing method for the job, negotiate if the 
client balks, keep useful records, and more in the award-winning 
"What to Charge: Pricing Strategies for Freelancers & Consultants." 
In print and ebook formats. http://tinyurl.com/obo5c2o 
*****************************************************************
A WRITER'S YEAR is the ONLY 365-day planner designed specifically
for writers! Plan your schedule, track billable hours, organize
tasks, and track your progress and achievements.  Each week brings
you an inspirational writing quote.  Best of all, it's F*R*E*E!
Download an electronic version in PDF or Excel, or access the print
edition: http://www.writing-world.com/store/year/index.shtml
*****************************************************************
GIFTS FOR WRITERS FROM WRITING-WORLD.COM! Are there writers (or 
readers) on your gift list?  Then check out the new line of "mugs 
for writers and readers" designed by Writing-World.com editor 
Moira Allen! Our gorgeous mugs (the kind you drink from, we mean) 
are designed especially for folks who love books -- who can't get 
enough books -- who can't stop writing books -- you know.  
Folks like you!  See our growing lineup at 
http://www.writing-world.com/store/mugs.shtml 
****************************************************************

=================================================================
EDITOR'S NOTE: Due to website updates, articles in this issue will
not be available on the Writing-World.com website until next week.
=================================================================

GUEST EDITORIAL - by Victoria Grossack
=================================================================


Improve Your Ability to Concentrate
-----------------------------------
Many of us writers have experienced great spurts of creativity and
productivity, but alas, these waves don't always last.  So I
decided to investigate why it is that on some days I can write 2000
words in four hours and on other days I dawdle through 250.  In
this editorial I share my findings with the hope that they will
help you improve your productivity.

Sometimes the answer is easy.  You really have no time.  You
haven't slept, or you have a headache.  Something else may be
bothering you -- it is tax time or you have discovered that your
mattress has bed bugs -- and so you are reasonably distracted.

Some people want to blame the Internet and other aspects of modern
life for their lack of concentration, and some studies show that
constant surfing hurts the brain's ability to focus.  These days,
you can spend thousands of dollars to wean yourself from these
distractions, or at least to take a break from them.  It seems
counter-intuitive to pay someone to deprive you of something, but
that is what rehab is all about.  However, I know that way back in
the last century, in pre-Internet days, that I sometimes had
similar difficulties concentrating.  I bet that writers
occasionally experienced it in the 19th century, too. 

So, what improves my ability to concentrate?

DEADLINES AND AGREEMENTS WITH OTHERS.  Promising a chapter or an
article to a third party is an effective motivator for me.  The one
time I participated in NaNoWriMo I finished the 50,000 words in the
month, which means that I wrote an average of 1667 words per day. 
I have noticed that this works in other areas of my life, too.  I
can readily apply my willpower when I have to fast for a medical
procedure, but I have trouble not eating when I want to lose five
pounds.  

It SHOULD take the same mindset, yet one is relatively easy
compared to the other.  With external deadlines, I can even get a
lot done in the face of distractions and hurdles; I write my way
through headaches and fatigue.  And this tells me that my reasons
for not writing are often just excuses, and that I COULD write if I
were more disciplined. 

After realizing this, I first decided to treat my own goals with
the respect that I give to promises made to others.  Second, I
decided to study the other factors that impact my productivity.

PHYSICAL PREPARATION.  Our brains live in our bodies and our minds
work better when we are physically fit.  In fact, increased
creativity seems to be connected to higher serotonin levels.  For
most people, serotonin peaks in the morning, but you know your own
rhythm. 

So, what helps make you physically fit?  Obviously, you need enough
sleep.  Next, walking and other forms of exercise can enhance
concentration.  Even a ten-minute stroll can make a difference. 
Most articles recommend going outside, but you may not want to do
this if it is dark, dangerous or if the weather is bad.  In this
case you can find a spot to pace for ten minutes in your house or
apartment.  I would not count on this to burn many calories, but it
can help get your circulation going, which helps mental acuity.  I
often write for twenty minutes and then pace for ten, interspersing
the back-and-forths with descending and ascending the stairs.  You
know what exercise options are available to you, and you know your
own excuses.

There's lots of advice about what you should and should not eat;
you need to adapt this to serve your own body and your brain.  Most
people need less sugar and carbs, and more protein, vegetables and
fruit.  Basically, you need a balanced diet.  

MENTAL PREPARATION.  It helps to think about your writing while you
are not doing it, such as during those ten minute pacing sessions
mentioned above.  You should also think about it when you are
waiting in line, such as at a stoplight or in line at your bank or
grocery store.

Mental preparation is most effective when it is specific, rather
than the general daydream hoping that your agent will land you a
movie deal.  Concentrate on your next scene.  What will your
characters do next?  What trouble can you get them into?  How can
you improve that scene?  If you come up with a good idea or a good
phrase, jot it down, or do your best to remember it until your next
writing session.

DEEP BREATHS.  Sometimes when I am confronted with a scene where I
am, frankly, stuck, I take several deep breaths before starting. 
Lots of people and websites recommend meditation but I don't have
the patience (kudos to you if you do).  I can however, take five to
ten deep breaths; it has made a huge difference it has made to some
of my projects.  Deep breathing is supposed to be good for
relieving stress too.

MINIMIZE DISTRACTIONS WHILE WRITING.  I surf way too much, so, in
order to reduce this, sometimes I use the airplane mode so as to
cut my access to the Internet.  This has some genuine
disadvantages, because it means I can't use the online dictionary
and thesaurus and other reference sites.  I also have to connect
for a few minutes now and then in order to download potentially
critical emails.  However, by using the airplane mode, I am
training myself to surf less, at least during my writing time.

You know your own distractions.  Some will be external, others
internal.  Once you have figured out what they are, take steps to
decrease their impact, at least during your writing time.  Perhaps
you have to stop posting on Facebook.  Perhaps you have to turn off
you phone.

Perhaps you have good reason to be worried about a certain
situation, such as the health of a loved one.  Do what you can do
about the problem, then if possible, tell yourself that not to
worry for the half hour or hour when you're working on your
project.  Life's problems are always with you, so unless there's
something that you can be doing about them at the moment you choose
to write, you might as well take some time for your writing.  After
all, creativity is one of the things that makes life worthwhile.

PLUNGE IN.  Even if you think you can only manage fifteen minutes,
don't hesitate to enter your story.  When you do, really focus on
each phrase, sentence, paragraph and scene and keep on going.  You
will probably get more done in your quarter-of-an-hour than you
expect.  And you may find yourself continuing, if you have the
time, or returning to it as soon as you can.

REMIND YOURSELF THAT YOU LIKE WRITING!  Sometimes I get such a kick
out of writing that I have withdrawal symptoms when circumstances
prevent me from working on my projects, but there are other times
when the idea of it seems like a burden.  I have to laugh off my
bad attitude.  However, if you truly do not like writing, then
perhaps you should seek another creative outlet.

Many of us have only a few hours now and then to devote to writing;
it is important to make the most of them.  By using these
techniques, my own discipline and productivity have improved.  I
believe, if you do likewise, yours will as well.  

Maybe I'll figure out how to lose those five pounds, too.


=================================================================

Victoria Grossack studied Creative Writing and English Literature
at Dartmouth College, and has published stories and articles in
such publications as Contingencies, Women's World and I Love Cats.
She is the author of Crafting Fabulous Fiction, a step-by-step
guide to developing and polishing novels and short stories that
includes many of her beloved columns. With Alice Underwood, she
co-authors the Tapestry of Bronze series (including Jocasta,
Mother-Wife of Oedipus; The Children of Tantalus; and Antigone &
Creon), based on Greek myths and set in the late Bronze Age. Her
independent novels include The Highbury Murders, in which she does
her best to channel the spirits and styles of Jane Austen and
Agatha Christie, and Academic Assassination (A Zofia Martin
Mystery). Victoria is married with kids, and (though American)
spends much of her time in Europe. Her hobbies include gardening,
hiking, bird-watching and tutoring mathematics. Visit her website
at http://www.tapestryofbronze.com, or contact her at tapestry (at)
tapestryofbronze (dot) com. 

=================================================================

Copyright 2015 Victoria Grossack 

This article may not be reprinted or posted without the written
permission of the author.

Link to this article here: 
http://www.writing-world.com/life/concentrate.shtml
***EDITOR'S NOTE: Due to website updates, articles in this issue
will not be available on the Writing-World.com website until next
week.

=================================================================

*****************************************************************
Stop struggling to come up with a fantastic title for your book 
or story. Get TERRIFIC TITLES – AN ALL-INCLUSIVE GUIDE TO CREATING 
STORY TITLES. Make your title stand out, determine genre specifics, 
learn what to avoid, and much, much more. Available at:  
http://tinyurl.com/TerrificTitles  
*****************************************************************
WIN UP TO $500 FOR WRITING A POEM OR SHORT STORY! Write a poem, 
30 lines or fewer on any subject and/or write a short story, 
5 pages maximum length, on any theme, for a chance to win cash 
prizes totaling $1275. Writing Prizes: $500, $250, $100. Poetry 
Prizes: $250, $100, $50. Postmark deadline: July 31, 2015. 
Visit http://www.dreamquestone.com for details on how to enter! 
*****************************************************************

FEATURE ARTICLE: What to Do When You Believe an Editor Is Wrong
By Maria Chatzi
================================================================
                           
Editors can either be chosen (as freelancers) by the writer-client,
as is often the case with self-publishing, or they may be the
publisher's choice, as when you're offered a contract by a
publishing house.  In both cases, there are times when we writers,
both inexperienced and experienced, believe the editor is wrong in
asking us to make changes to our manuscript, or in rejecting it. 
We may feel the editor does not understand the value or the meaning
of our book or article. So, what is a writer to do?  Accept the
changes the editor asks for, or put an end to the cooperation with
the editor?  Is it better to change your editor instead of making
the suggested changes to your book or article?  And finally, what
is the best, least risky strategy for dealing with such an issue? 

First, it is necessary to make it clear that a writer's
relationship with a freelance editor (i.e., one that the writer has
chosen to hire) is different from that with a publishing house's
editor. If the editor is hired by the writer, the author has the
freedom to risk ignoring any suggestions the editor makes (which is
a waste of money, of course) or find another editor.  When dealing
with the editor of a publishing house, however, the writer has
little or no choice, as the publisher (not the author) is the
source of the editor's paycheck. If  the author is daring enough to
risk not being published by the specific house, he may ask the
publisher to assign another editor or allow a cooperation with an
outside freelance editor. 

Second, remember that editing is done on three levels:
Developmental (Structural and Line) editing, Copyediting and
Proofreading.  It is mainly developmental (or content) editing that
hurts. This is the area where most disagreements arise.  When
changes are of minor importance to the author, such as spelling or
replacing a weak verb with a stronger one, they rarely cause an
issue, especially if it is clear that such changes improve the
manuscript.

Here are some examples of the types of changes developmental
editors may request:

* Fiction book editors may ask you to cut chapters from your novel
(e.g., cutting the first two chapters because "the story really
starts in Chapter 3"), change the ending, the story arc, or delete
a scene you are proud of.  

* Nonfiction book editors may tell you to cut treasured personal
anecdotes, change your book's structure, or add or delete sources. 
They may also challenge your facts, arguments and examples.

* Magazine and newspaper editors may ask you to change the
structure of your article, shorten your text, or cut examples. 
They may challenge your research, interviews and interpretations of
facts.  They may ask you to change main points or conclusions in
your article. Sometimes, article editors may change a piece -- by
cutting or adding lines or paragraphs -- without the author's
consent, changes you may not see until the article is published.  

* Book editors may change your title and subtitle.  Periodical
editors may change headlines and subheads.

* Editors of books AND periodicals may ask you to change the style
of your manuscript.  Sometimes such changes are based on the
in-house editorial style, which in turn is based on the intended
audience.  If, however, a request to change one's style is based
purely on editorial preference, many writers wonder whether an
editor is justified in asserting that much control over "style" in
a manuscript.  Many writers consider this an attack upon their
identity, because one's personal writing style is part of the
writer's voice and authenticity.

It is important for writers to determine from the start where to
draw the line: What things one is not willing to change just to get
published.  That being said, our PERSONAL reaction to editorial
suggestions is a matter of thinking and attitude -- areas over
which we DO have control.

As writers, we question things. We are truth seekers.  Before
making the decision to find another editor or cancelling a
contract, a writer must determine the truth of the situation rather
than simply responding to emotional reactions.  Is it possible to
tell with certainty who is right and who is wrong? 

Go on a Truth Hunt
------------------
1. Check Your Wisdom

Have you chosen your editor or publishing house wisely?  What is
the editor's and/or publishing house's specialty?  What is their
policy?  Is your book or article a mirror of your expertise in the
field (skills, knowledge and experience)?  Have you submitted to a
magazine or website that is a good fit for your article?  Have you
followed the guidelines?  Have you submitted your best work?  Does
your manuscript add to the publisher's good reputation?

2. Define "Right" and "Wrong."

How do you define "right" (as in "I am right") vs. wrong (as in
"the editor is wrong")?  Such definitions can be objective or
subjective.  They can reflect social concerns, social norms,
historical time and individual experiences.  They may change with
time.  Search yourself carefully to determine where your belief in
right vs. wrong has been formed, and what the reality is behind it.
 Is it a belief or an emotion?  Is it a belief based on objective,
measurable factors or might it be a matter of opinion or taste? 
Having different beliefs or opinions does not necessarily mean one
person is wrong and the other is right.

Questions to Ask Yourself
-------------------------
1) Why do I believe the editor is wrong?  What proof do I have?

Be as specific as possible, and don't try to support your argument
with opinions of friends and family.

2) What does the editor stand to lose if I am right?  What will she
gain if I am wrong?

Most editors are professionals: They know it boils down to doing
business, and are not concerned about satisfying their egos.  In
other words, editors have much less "ego" on the line than writers.

3) Could I be wrong?  Might I be distorting the truth in some way
about my manuscript?  How?  

For example, am I deceiving myself as to the appropriateness of my
style for the publication's audience?  Have I supported my
conclusions with facts rather than strongly held opinions?

4) Do I want to be right because my ego needs it?  Is it painful to
accept that the editor might be right?

It's easy to become emotionally attached to a manuscript and
fiercely defensive against criticisms.

5) Have I written something the editor does not believe in, or that
is contrary to her values?

We all have our own values, beliefs, opinions and preferences. 
They are deeply rooted in our minds and hearts, guiding and ruling
our lives.  If you are not in the same boat with your editor
regarding beliefs and values, don't write an article in hopes that
you'll change his mind; experience tells me you can never win.

6) Could we both be right?  In what way?

Have I clearly understood what the editor is telling me?  Can I
read between the lines?  Has the editor made herself clear enough? 
Have I made everything clear to the editor?  Could we both be
saying the same thing in different ways? 

7) What do we disagree about?  

Are we disagreeing over whether a problem exists in the manuscript
in the first place, or are we disagreeing over the best way to fix
it?  How significant is the disagreement?  Could we brainstorm a
different solution?

Bridging the Gap: The Ultimate Goal
-----------------------------------
When we believe the editor is wrong, there seems to be a gap
between what we want as writers and what the editor wants.  This
gap does not actually exist – it is an illusion created by the way
we think.  In reality, it is not a question of who is right or
wrong but of what does the job best.  We both have the same
ultimate goal: Satisfied, happy readers.  The difference is in the
priorities each of us hold in order to reach that common goal. Our
priority, as writers, is to have our book or article published. 
The editor's is to make sure only the best and fittest of submitted
manuscripts will be published, so as to guard the publisher's or
website's identity. The difference in our priorities is a result of
the different jobs we are doing. We have different responsibilities
and each of us will be accountable for accomplishing different
tasks. Writers and editors need each other. We are like the key and
its lock. Together, we can unlock the doors of wonder to our
readers.  Keep in mind:

1) Some editors are writers themselves.  They know the hardships
you are going through.  They, too, have experienced rejection and
have been asked to make changes to their manuscripts by some other
editor.

2) Editors may also be the publishers or owners of the website or
publishing house you are submitting to.  You need to trust them;
they know their business well.  Make sure your work matches their
business vision, because they know their market better than you do.

3) Some editors are  educators.  They are skillful and experienced
and know what you need to learn.  They can teach you many things.

4) Last but not least, most editors are avid readers.  They don't
reject manuscripts because they don't love writing, but because
they DO.
Thus, actually, editors and writers have a lot in common -- much
more than we tend to think.  Focusing on these similarities, rather
than our differences, can help us all reach our end goal faster and
more effectively. Moreover, if the editor is someone whose work you
admire, you don't want to miss the opportunity to work with this
person.  Adopt a positive attitude, even if you are skeptical, and
think of the editor as your friend.

Five Ways to Treat an Editor Like a Friend
------------------------------------------
1) Listen without arguing or becoming defensive.  Be honest with
yourself when evaluating feedback.  Make sure you both understand
what the other is saying.  If you do not understand something, ask
for clarification.

2) Everyone has feelings -- be respectful and considerate.

3) Avoid being too emotionally attached to your viewpoint.  Try to
see your work through the editor's eyes.

4) Trust that editors have good intentions.  They want to help you
improve, not to change or embarrass you.

5) Make your cooperation a fun, exciting experience.  Be a
problem-solver, easy to work with.

I admit that there is a minority of unfriendly, unprofessional,
inexperienced and not so clever editors in the industry, with whom
it is wise not to spend your precious time.  But the same is true
for writers too.  Most editors are wonderful and inspiring people
for the writers who can appreciate them. 

Of course, you can always hunt for another editor, if you see no
benefit in bridging the "gap." Sometimes, people are just a bad
match and the only thing you can do is accept it and compromise or
end the relationship and move on. However, before you set out for a
new editor, please read this article once again and try to apply it
to your case.  A couple of years from now, you may be surprised to
realize that the editor you once believed wrong proved to be a
great mentor and a driving force in your writing career. 

=================================================================

Maria Chatzi is a teacher, a writer, a self-taught artist, and a
craft designer. Her goal is to help children and adults acknowledge
their creative identity and discover their potential, so they can
play an active part in the new creative culture.  Her teaching and
writings aim at equipping people with the techniques they need to
acquire self-knowledge, be creative thinkers, build their
self-esteem and succeed.  She does a lot of volunteering,
especially for public libraries, leading Arts and Crafts Workshops
(for adults and children) and Creative Writing Workshops (mainly
for children).   You can find some of her work online at
http://www.creativity-portal.com/howto/a/maria-chatzi/ 

=================================================================

Copyright 2015 Maria Chatzi

This article may not be reprinted without the author's written
permission.

Link to this article here:
http://www.writing-world.com/freelance/wrong.shtml

***EDITOR'S NOTE: Due to website updates, articles in this issue
will not be available on the Writing-World.com website until next
week.

*****************************************************************
FREE CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS
WritingCareer.com is a free online resource to find paying markets
for your poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Updated daily, we report
on current needs of editors and publishers who are open for
submissions, pay competitive rates, and do not charge reading fees.
http://www.writingcareer.com  
****************************************************************
IMAGINE A REVOLUTIONARY WEBSITE BUILDER created by writers for
writers. Imagine tools so smart they can present your works to
maximum effect with minimal effort on your side. Imagine a
professional website that wows your current and future readers. 
Got it? Now join us and make this vision real with Readership 
Pro:  http://tinyurl.com/md7qs77 
****************************************************************

NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
================================================================= 

Get Caught Reading Comic Books...
---------------------------------
May is "Get Caught Reading Month," sponsored by the Association of
American Publishers, and this year, the focus is on comic books. 
Posters feature comic book characters "caught reading," and during
Children's Book Week (May 4-11), millions of free comic books will
be distributed to kids throughout the country.  According to Comic
Book Legal Defense Fund Exectuive Director Charles Brownstein, "The
freedom to read is an ongoing challenge for our industry, with many
seeking to censor thoughts and ideas that they don't agree with. 
Comic books and graphic novels are especially likely to be
challenged or even banned.  We're pleased to participate in this
campaign that raises awareness of the role comic books have in our
culture and supports the pleasure of reading."  For more on this
story, visit http://www.getcaughtreading.org/ or 
http://tinyurl.com/oa2pua9

Children's Book Council Brings Books to Mothers Behind Bars
-----------------------------------------------------------
The Children's Book Council has teamed with The UnPrison Project to
build libraries in prisons in ten states.  These libraries will be
a place where mothers who are in prison can read to their babies in
prison nurseries.  Seventeen CBC publishers have joined in the
effort, and will be donating copies of 45 hand-picked titles for
children ages 0-18 months.  The books will be paired with
interactive reading guides.  The UnPrison Project, founded by
Deborah Jiang-Stein, works to turn "visiting day into reading day"
by providing books to women in prison.  "It's good for children,
and good for mothers who are trying to be involved and supportive
parents at a distance."  For more information on The UnPrison
Project, visit http://www.unprisonproject.org/

Researchers Map Shakespeare's London
------------------------------------
Researchers at the University of Victoria, Canada, have created an
interactive digital version of a 16th-century map that "presents
this really wonderful picture of London as Shakespeare would have
seen it," according to project director Janelle Jenstad.  The
research team filled in vast amounts of missing information,
labelling neighbourhoods, streets, waterways, landmarks, taverns,
churches and brothels.  "There's an extra layer of meaning in those
plays that's lost to us unless we're prepared to enter that space
virtually," says Jenstad.  For details, visit 
http://tinyurl.com/pb9x3wu or go to http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/ to
see the map itself.

*****************************************************************
LEARN WRITING FROM AN AUTHENTIC PERSON VALUING YOUR UNIQUE VOICE.
Editing. Group and individual classes, customized or formalized.
Instructor has taught writing 11 years at universities. Genre, 
Literary, Innovative, Fabulist Fiction and more. You owe 
Yourself! http://onlinewritingacademy.weebly.com/ - 
*****************************************************************
WIN PRIZES FOR YOUR WRITING WITH THE LARGEST GUIDE TO WRITING 
CONTESTS, from Writing-World.com!  "Writing to Win" brings you 
more than 1600 contest listings from around the world.  You won't 
find a more comprehensive guide to writing contests anywhere.  
Available in print and Kindle editions from Amazon!
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1470025825/peregrine
*****************************************************************

NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR JUNE
================================================================= 
This section lists contests that charge no entry fees. Unless 
otherwise indicated, competitions are open to all adult writers. 

CHIPOTLE CULTIVATING CREATIVITY STUDENT ESSAY CONTEST
-----------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: May 31
PRIZES: 10x $20,000 scholarship and publication on Chipotle products
DETAILS: Submit a short, original (and amazing) essay about a time
when food created a memory. Impress us with your creativity and you
could win big.  Open to students in the 48 contiguous United States
(excluding Alaska and Hawaii) between ages 13 and 18, who plan to
continue to college.  Maximum 1700 words.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
URL: http://cultivatingthought.com/essaycontest/

KURT SCHORK AWARDS IN INTERNATIONAL JOURNALISM (US/UK) 
------------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: May 31
PRIZES: 2x $5,000 
DETAILS: To recognize and assist freelance and local journalists
who make such a critical contribution to international
understanding. Two categories: For a freelance journalist covering
international news; and for a local reporter covering events within
their home country or region. The stories can be about conflict,
human rights, cross-border issues, corruption, or any other
controversial matter in a particular country or region. Each
submission must demonstrate professionalism, meet international
journalistic standards and provide evidence that courage and
determination were required in covering the story. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: 2015 Kurt Schork Awards, c/o Context Graphics Limited, 1
Savernake Court, Old Church Lane, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 2RJ, UK,
enquiries@ksmfund.org.
URL: http://www.ksmfund.org/awards

SHUBERT FENDRICH MEMORIAL PLAYWRITING CONTEST
---------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 1 
PRIZES: $1,000 
DETAILS: This is an ongoing contest, with a winner selected by June
1 each year from all eligible submissions received the previous
year.  All eligible plays accepted for publication will be
considered contest finalists, from which the winner will be
selected.  We will only consider manuscripts with a running time
between 20 and 90 minutes. Submissions must be family friendly in
both subject and language.  No cursing.  No explicitly adult
content. We prefer casts that are either balanced or favoring
females.  The more gender neutral roles, the better. We favor plays
and musicals with ensemble casts, where more than just a few have a
chance to shine. Plays with elaborate set, costume or technical
requirements are not appealing because of the limited resources of
our customers.  
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: Playwriting Contest, Pioneer Drama Service, P.O. Box 4267,
Englewood, CO 80155, playwrights@pioneerdrama.com
URL: http://www.pioneerdrama.com/playwrights/contest.asp

TONY HILLERMAN PRIZE
--------------------
DEADLINE: June 1 
PRIZES: Publication & advance of $10,000
DETAILS: Open to all writers who have never been the author of a
published mystery. Book length manuscripts. Solving a murder or
crime must be central to the story. The story’s primary setting
must be the Southwestern United States, including at least one of
the following states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New
Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Utah. Only one entry per writer.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: St. Martin’s Minotaur/THWC Competition, St. Martin’s
Minotaur, 175 5th Ave., New York, NY 10010 (for information and
entry forms)
URL: http://wordharvest.com/contest/

PROUD TO BE: WRITING BY AMERICAN WARRIORS CONTEST
-------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 1
PRIZES: $250 in each genre plus publication in annual anthology
'Proud to Be: Writing by American Warriors'.
DETAILS: Open to US military personnel, veterans, and their
families. The theme is the military service perspectives of our
soldiers and veterans of all conflicts and of their families.
Poetry: 1-3 poems, maximum 5 single-spaced pages; Prose: One story,
essay, or interview, maximum 5,000 words.
CONTACT: Warriors Anthology, Southeast Missouri State University
Press, MS 2650, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: E-mail entries to upress@semo.edu
URL: 
http://www.semopress.com/events/proud-to-be-writing-by-american-warriors/

A MIDSUMMER TALE NARRATIVE WRITING CONTEST
-------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 21
PRIZES: Amazon gift cards; 1st place is $35-$50 depending on # of
entries
DETAILS: For this year's AMT contest, your story must involve
spending the summer -- the whole summer, not a brief vacation -- in
a location different than where you or your protagonist live the
rest of the year. This could mean either going away from home
("summer home") or returning home ("home for the summer"). The
change in setting must be integral to the story. Can be Fiction or
Creative Nonfiction.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Send entries to
amtcontest15@toasted-cheese.com with the subject line: A Midsummer
Tale Contest Entry
WEBSITE: http://tclj.toasted-cheese.com/a-midsummer-tale/

ABA JOURNAL/ROSS WRITING CONTEST FOR LEGAL SHORT FICTION 
--------------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 30
PRIZES: $3,000 
DETAILS: Entries must be original works of fiction of no more than
5,000 words that illuminate the role of the law and/or lawyers in
modern society. Entrants must be U.S. citizens or legal permanent
residents.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
CONTACT: American Bar Association, 321 N. Clark St., Chicago, IL
60654
URL: http://www.abajournal.com/contests/ross_essay/

ALCS AWARD FOR EDUCATIONAL WRITING (UK)
---------------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 30 
PRIZES: £2,000
DETAILS: Given to an outstanding example of traditionally published
non-fiction that enhances teaching and learning. Celebrates books
that encourage students to read widely and build up an
understanding of the subject, rather than only mirroring
examination specifications. See listing for target age group, which
varies from year to year. The award this year is for books
published during 2013 and 2014 for the 5-11 age group. The award
will be given to an outstanding example of traditionally published
non-fiction (with or without illustrations) that stimulates and
enhances learning. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Paula Johnson, Awards Secretary, The Society of Authors,
84 Drayton Gardens, London SW10 9SB, UK,
pjohnson@societyofauthors.org
URL: http://www.societyofauthors.org/education-book-prizes

THE BULWER-LYTTON FICTION CONTEST
---------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 30, 2014
PRIZES: A Pittance
DETAILS:   Submit the worst possible opening sentence for a story
up to 60 words max.  Enter as many times as you like.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
URL: http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/  

DRUE HEINZ LITERATURE PRIZE
---------------------------
DEADLINE: June 30
PRIZES: $15,000
DETAILS: Open to writers around the world who have published a
book-length collection of fiction or a minimum of three short
stories or novellas in commercial magazines or literary journals of
national distribution. Online publication does not count. Submit a
manuscript of short stories; one or more novellas (a novella may
comprise a maximum of 130 double-spaced typed pages); or a
combination of one or more novellas and short stories. Novellas are
only accepted as part of a larger collection.  
CONTACT: Send submissions to: Drue Heinz Literature Prize,
University of Pittsburgh Press, 7500 Thomas Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA
15260 (For UPS, FedEx, use zip code 15208), info@upress.pitt.edu
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
URL: http://tinyurl.com/33gx6y

ERIC HOFFER AWARD FOR PROSE
---------------------------
QUARTERLY DEADLINE: June 30
PRIZES: $250
DETAILS: Open to short works of fiction and creative nonfiction, to
10,000 words, unpublished (do not submit if published online).
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
CONTACT: The Eric Hoffer Award, P.O. Box 11, Titusville, NJ 08560,
info@hofferaward.com
URL: http://www.hofferaward.com/HAprose.html

L. RON HUBBARD'S WRITERS OF THE FUTURE CONTEST
----------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 30 (given quarterly)
PRIZES: $1,000 first prize awarded each quarter; one of those
winners also receives the $5,000 annual "Gold Award" grand prize. 
DETAILS:  17,000 words maximum short story. All types of science
fiction, fantasy and horror with fantastic elements, are welcome. 
URL: http://www.writersofthefuture.com/Contest-Rules-Writers/

MARY BALLARD POETRY CHAPBOOK PRIZE
----------------------------------
DEADLINE:  June 30
PRIZE: $500 and publication of chapbook
DETAILS:  Submit a poetry chapbook, either one long poem or a
collection of poems. All poems must adhere to a theme. Submit 20-40
pages of poetry.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
URL:  http://caseyshaypress.blogspot.com/

NATIONAL POETRY ANTHOLOGY (UK)
------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 30 
PRIZES: £1,000
Details: Submit up to three poems by post or one online, max. 20
lines/160 words. UK residents only. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: United Press, Admail 3735, London, EC1B 1JB, UK;
info@unitedpress.co.uk
URL: http://www.unitedpress.co.uk/

PCS-WORDS COMPETITION
---------------------
DEADLINE: June 30
PRIZES: £75, £50, £25 and publication in Words Magazine.
DETAILS:  Submit a short story on the theme of murder, max. 2000
words.  No limit on number of entries; all entries will be
considered for publication in the magazine. 
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Submit entries to june15@wordsmag.com
URL: http://www.wordsmag.com/compcal15.htm

SPS STUDIOS POETRY CARD CONTEST
-------------------------------
DEADLINE: June 30
PRIZES: $300, $150, $50 and publication on website 
DETAILS: Write a poem for publication in a greeting card, rhyming
or non-rhyming.   
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
URL: http://www.sps.com/poetry/index.html


MONTHLY/RECURRING COMPETITIONS:
===============================
The competitions below are offered monthly unless otherwise noted;
all require electronic submissions.

FANSTORY.COM
------------
PRIZES: $100 and other prizes
DETAILS: Various monthly fiction, nonfiction and poetry contests;
for some, you must become a member of the site.
WEBSITE: http://www.fanstory.com/contests.jsp

THE NEXT BIG WRITER
-------------------
PRIZES: $100, $50, $25, plus review and membership
DETAILS: Must be a member. Competitions throughout the year,
including novels and flash fiction. 
WEBSITE: http://www.thenextbigwriter.com/competition/index.html

PENN COVE LITERARY ARTS AWARD
-----------------------------
PRIZES: $50
DETAILS: Submit fiction, creative nonfiction, prose poetry, and
writing for children/young adults to 1,000 words. The first story
that "knocks the judges' socks off" each month is declared the
winner. Use the link below to access the submission page - that
page has links to the guidelines for submissions.
WEBSITE: http://whidbeystudents.com/student-choice-contest/

SCRIBOPHILE WRITING CONTESTS
----------------------------
Bimonthly/Quarterly
PRIZES: $50 to $100 Amazon gift certificates
DETAILS: Short stories, flash fiction, poetry, on themes posted on
website.
WEBSITE: http://www.scribophile.com/contests/ 

WRITER'S DIGEST YOUR STORY COMPETITION
--------------------------------------
Bimonthly
PRIZES: $100 in WD books
DETAILS: We'll provide a short, open-ended prompt. In turn, you'll
submit a short story of 750 words or fewer based on that prompt.
You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your
story. 
WEBSITE: http://www.writersdigest.com/your-story-competition

*****************************************************************

ADVERTISE in WRITING WORLD or on WRITING-WORLD.COM!  For details 
on how to reach more than 100,000 writers a month with your 
product, service or book title, visit
http://www.writing-world.com/admin1/adrates.shtml

*****************************************************************

Writing World is a publication of Writing-World.com
http://www.writing-world.com

Readers are welcome to forward this newsletter by e-mail IN ITS
ENTIRETY. This newsletter may not be reposted or republished in
any form, online or in print, nor may individual articles be 
published or posted without the written permission of the author
unless otherwise indicated.

Editor and Publisher: MOIRA ALLEN (editors"at"writing-world.com) 

Copyright 2015 Moira Allen







Copyright © 2017 by Moira Allen. All rights reserved.
All materials on this site are the property of their authors
and may not be reprinted without the author's written permission,
unless otherwise indicated.
For more information please contact Moira Allen, Editor