Writing World Newsletter Archive
Return to Newsletter Index · Home



******************************************************************

W R I T I N G   W O R L D

A World of Writing Information - For Writers Around the World

http://www.writing-world.com

Issue 15:21 - November 5, 2015
*****************************************************************
MANAGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION: See the bottom of this newsletter for
details on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editor.
*****************************************************************
COPYRIGHT NOTICE: No material published in this newsletter may be
reprinted or posted without the consent of the author unless
otherwise noted. Unauthorized use is a copyright infringement.
*****************************************************************
IN THIS ISSUE:
=================================================================

GUEST EDITORIAL, by Devyani Borade
     Is Writing Every Day a Bad Idea?
FEATURE ARTICLE, by Victoria Grossack
     Yes – No – Maybe - and Maybe Later
NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR DECEMBER
PLUS: NEWS FOR WRITERS; THE WRITE SITES
                           
****************************************************************
EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FREELANCE FEES! Learn how to 
choose the best pricing method for the job, negotiate if the 
client balks, keep useful records, and more in the award-winning 
"What to Charge: Pricing Strategies for Freelancers & Consultants." 
In print and ebook formats. http://tinyurl.com/obo5c2o 
*****************************************************************
MAKE A LIVING AS A WRITER! It's true! You CAN actually make a 
living as a writer. Discover 9 different ways to turn your talent 
into a legitimate and lucrative freelance writing career. This 
free report shows you how you can get started now... Download your 
Free Report today. http://www.thebarefootwriter.com/free/start-now/?utm_campaign=WWOA01&utm_source=writingworld - 
*****************************************************************
-=-=-=-=-=-  FANSTORY.COM  -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Get feedback for your writing.
Enter writing contests with cash prizes.
Learn more:  http://9nl.it/8gij
-=-=-= Get Started In Less Than 5 Minutes! -=-=-=-=-  
*****************************************************************
WritersCollege.com: Looking for writing classes? Want to write for
publication or for personal growth? Want to sharpen those 
professional skills? We have classes in most genres that are 
cheap and informative and come with a 10-day money-back guarantee.
http://www.WritersCollege.com
*****************************************************************


=================================================================

Guest Editorial - by Devyani Borade
=================================================================

IS WRITING EVERY DAY A BAD IDEA?
--------------------------------

We've all heard the arguments: Practice makes perfect. Writing 
every day will force us to develop a habit. It's a great way to 
get over writer's block. Writing more improves writing. It 
achieves the aim, gets the job done.

We've all believed it. Even tried it. We start off by setting 
ourselves ambitious goals. After doing the maths we arrive at a 
magic number. An "ideal" goal. Like writing 2000 words a day. 
Perhaps for the first few days we even manage it. And we feel 
proud of ourselves. Gradually, though, we start to  slip up. Miss 
a day here, two there. An ill child. A surprise visit. An 
overflowing inbox. An insistent friend. Urgency changes the game. 
Life gets in the way. Writing falls down in priority. At the end 
of the month, we find we've actually written on only ten days. 
And our spirit flags. What's the use? we say. We'll never be 
able to stick to this schedule. It's going to fail. And then, 
some of us give up.

Others are more persistent. Perhaps our goal was too challenging. 
How about starting small? Like writing 500 words a day. Surely I 
can manage that? That little window of time I can snatch in the 
morning when I've dropped off junior at school and am about to 
start my mad scramble to work? Or that sliver of time I can carve 
out at night after the kids have dropped off to sleep and the wife 
is catching up on her reading? But then one day junior gets late 
and there's an early meeting at the office, or the kids are too 
wired to sleep on time and the wife expects a helping hand to 
tuck them in to bed, and that precious slice of time gets 
squeezed out, gone. And once again, having failed in our resolve 
to write every day, we recognise the enterprise as doomed and 
many of us give up.

It's like all those New Year resolutions we make: eat healthier, 
exercise regularly, give up smoking. Eight days into the new year 
and we've already forgotten them.

Once we get a setback, we beat ourselves up, get de-motivated 
and stop going forward. Negativity begets negativity. One 
slip-up triggers the end, and another couple bring about a 
complete shut-down. Why?


================================================================
The problem may lie not in the goals, nor in the execution of 
those goals, but in the basic premise itself: that of writing 
EVERY day.

Hordes of authors and editors swear by this maxim. As if writing 
every day is some sort of a silver bullet to our troubles. To an 
extent it could help. If you're one of those people who are 
full-time novelists, or with no imperative family responsibilities, 
or working to complete a thesis or academic paper, then writing 
every day (or whatever regular schedule you choose to set up) may 
work well for you. It does force you to get disciplined. It does 
help you revisit your characters, recall them frequently, or keep 
them fresh at the forefront of your mind. It does put the words 
on paper and help you reach that final page.

But if you're not, then forcing yourself to write X number of 
words every day is not going to improve your writing in any 
significant way. Stealing ten minutes on the toilet to thrash out 
a hundred words will not make you a better writer. Instead, 
spending a concentrated four hours revising, editing and 
polishing your work, or finding an apt verb or a better rhythm 
to a sentence, will. Even if these four hours come over a period 
of three weeks. If you're having to force yourself into doing 
something, then you're not really enjoying it. And if there's 
one thing we writers enjoy doing, it's writing.

Making the goal too small will not make things easier. It only 
defeats the purpose. It's like trying to trick yourself into 
working, like trying to manipulate your mind into writing "just 
a mere 100 words a day" and then feeling good about your 
achievement. But if the aim is not challenging enough, you're 
not going to derive much joy in reaching it. Think about it: 
would you feel proud of having walked to the corner shop to get 
a loaf of bread? How about walking cross-country across five 
states on a camping trip? See the difference? You don't stretch 
yourself for the low-hanging fruit, and it doesn't taste as sweet.

It is important to analyse why you write and then set your goals 
accordingly. Fiction requires imagination and cannot be tapped 
at will at a specific time every day. So having a rigid writing 
schedule doesn't work for writers who write fiction while holding 
down a traditional day job. But for those who write fiction to 
earn their livelihood, they are "writing" even when they are not 
writing: they are dreaming up plots while folding the laundry, 
weaving conflicts as they set the table, following their characters 
as the dishes pile up at the sink, and generally living their 
story. They are always at it. And in such circumstances, setting 
aside two hours at a specific time every day just to write makes 
sense. So also with academic writing that requires dull, often 
dry research, albeit with consistency.

A possible compromise between having a rigid schedule and none 
at all is the "maintenance mode." This means setting aside a 
flexible time -- some time, any time -- every week to reconnect 
with your writing. Putting yourself into maintenance mode does 
not mean re-reading email messages or submission guidelines! 
That kind of "keeping in touch" isn't going to get any work done. 
Instead, if you find at this time you're not in the mood for 
writing, try pitching to markets. Re-visit older stories to see 
if they can be re-purposed. Edit something you'd been working 
on two weeks ago. Read others. Listen to audio books.

So write as much as you can. Go for NaNoWriMo if you like. Only, 
don't chuck up the whole thing simply because you couldn't write 
every single day. Nobody ever published a blank page. Just write 
when you can, when it makes you happy. The writer in you will 
thank you for it.

=================================================================

Devyani Borade writes for magazines across the world. She has
successfully negotiated higher payment rates for the majority
of her articles and stories, and survived to continue writing.
Visit her website Verbolatry at http://devyaniborade.blogspot.com
to contact her and read some of her other work.

=================================================================

Copyright 2015 Devyani Borade

This article may not be reprinted without the author's written 
permission.

Link to this article here:
http://www.writing-world.com/life/daily.shtml

*****************************************************************
MEET DEBORA, THE WRITER. HER PEN HAS A MIND OF ITS OWN.

Within the virtual pages of a brand new newsletter, Debora and her 
pen wrestle with the strange, weird and wonderful in a writer's 
life. Laugh and sigh, grin and grumble, sulk and smirk with them as 
they navigate the pleasures and pitfalls of the writing world, where 
chuckles and chagrin abound.

Brought to us by Writing-World.com's own Devyani Borade, Debora's 
Pen is sure to keep you chuckling (and nodding as her experiences 
come all too close to your own!)

Get your monthly fix of mirth by subscribing for free at
http://devyaniborade.blogspot.com/p/newsletter.html


(Insert cartoon)

*****************************************************************
DO YOU LOVE LANGUAGE - how words work to thrill, convince, dazzle,
and excite?  THINK LIKE A WRITER will help you corral your writing
ideas - and saddle up the stories you've always wanted to write!
Discover tools, strategies, and prompts that bring your unique
perspective, experience and ability to life on the page.  Now 
available from Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00Y3TWNGI
*****************************************************************
DOWNLOAD A WRITER'S YEAR 2016 - THE ONLY PLANNER DESIGNED FOR
WRITERS! The 2016 edition of A Writer's Year is now available! 
Packed with inspirational writing quotes to help keep you focused, 
our planner offers a 24-hour schedule with writers in mind! Use it 
to help plan your schedule, keep track of to-do lists, track 
billable hours, organize tasks, keep track of deadlines and goals, 
and record achievements and submissions. Includes a submission
tracker. And as always, the electronic edition is available 
F*R*E*E! Visit http://www.writing-world.com/store/year/index.shtml 
To download today, or order a print copy from Amazon!
*****************************************************************
FEATURE ARTICLE: Yes - No - Maybe - And Maybe Later
by Victoria Grossack

================================================================

Whether you write full-time or only a few hours each month, your 
writing time is limited.  And, as a writer, you are often your 
own boss, so you must decide how you spend that time.  How you 
use your time can impact your success as a writer (however you 
define success).

New projects, requests, opportunities and time-drains pop up 
nearly every day.  Some may occur to you as you scan guidelines 
and blogs; others may be requests or suggestions from people you 
know; while yet others may be ideas that your muse has dropped 
into your brain.  If you're like most people, you can't work on 
them all.  You have to prioritize.  Let me recommend the use of 
categories such as YES, NO, MAYBE – and MAYBE LATER.

Know Yourself
-------------
Before deciding what to do with an idea or an opportunity, it 
helps to know yourself.  This sounds easy, but sometimes requires 
a reality check.  Perhaps you are thrilled by a particular project 
but must recognize that you are not ready to write it.  The idea 
for "Jocasta" came to me when I was 14 years old, but I was well 
aware that I lacked the talent, skill and knowledge to write that 
novel.  I put it into my MAYBE LATER category for decade.

Here are some questions you should know about yourself.  What 
interests you?  What do you want to work on?  In which areas do 
you have expertise?  How can you develop expertise?  Do you have 
the skills to write what you want to write?  If not, can you 
develop them?  Do you have the time and the energy?  What are 
your other commitments?  What do you believe you deserve in 
recompense for this work?  What other questions make sense for 
you?

You also should know what you want, both for right now and your 
future.  Also, as you pursue your writing career, your answers 
and criteria may change.  At the beginning, when you are learning 
to write, you may be willing to work for nothing more than the 
thrill of creation (and it is a real thrill).  Later you may be 
writing to pay the bills, or you may have a contract requiring a 
particular project.

Yes
---
You should say YES when the project interests you, when you have 
the skills and the time to do it, when it offers a worthwhile 
return and when it deserves to be prioritized above other projects.

You may say yes to projects that do not meet all these criteria.  
I have written many articles about developments in the energy 
field that were only of mild interest to me.  However, they did 
not take a lot of time, the pay was reasonable, and I find that 
doing occasional articles helps keep my writing disciplined.  
Also, I like having a mix of projects to work on -- some fiction, 
some nonfiction, some long and some short.  After finishing a 
section of a novel, it helps to take a break and to do a few 
shorter pieces.

You should know the mix of projects that you prefer, or if you 
prefer to keep your head down and work non-stop on something.

If you have said yes to a project but are having trouble 
continuing, then you should examine your commitment to that 
project.

No
--
This is an important word, and one that you may feel guilty 
using.  However, unless you say no when you need to, you may not 
accomplish much, and people will ask you to work for little or 
nothing.

The first person you must tell NO is yourself.  Besides the 
general time-wasters (and we all have them), you may have to say 
no to some projects.  If you want to finish a particular project, 
you can't spend all your time starting others. 

After you tell yourself no, sometimes you must say no to other 
people and opportunities.  I was asked to join a poetry-writing 
circle.  Turning this down was easy because I rarely write poetry, 
and in this case the organizer understood.  I said no to a random 
person who wanted me to send him, at my expense, an autographed 
copy of one of my books.  He was not a reviewer, so I saw no 
advantage to it.  (Actually, I did not say no, but I did not 
answer his email.)

Frequently people suggest ideas for books or articles to me.  
Many of the people making these suggestions know nothing about 
my writing or the article market and so usually their suggestions 
go into the "no" category.  Other writing professionals -- my 
editors, my agent, my co-author -- are far more likely to suggest 
projects that are worthwhile.
 
Maybe
-----
The MAYBE category is interesting.  You may use it when you have 
an idea that interests you, but for which there are several reasons 
why it is difficult.  You may currently lack the time, or perhaps 
it needs more research.  You can put these ideas into your MAYBE 
LATER category.

Some maybes are due to requests from other people.  In these 
cases you may not be passionate about the projects, but will 
consider them depending on what you can negotiate.  Here are a 
few of my maybes.

One editor with another e-zine wrote to ask if he could post 
one of my "Crafting Fabulous Fiction" articles from Writing-World.com 
at his website.  I do sell reprints, but apparently he wanted it 
for nothing.  In this case the MAYBE became a NO.  However, my 
note to him was friendly and polite, because there's no reason 
to offend someone who may be in a position to pay later.  Besides, 
I might want to use his outlet for publicity later.  

Whether or not you want to give away your work depends on what 
stage you are in your career, your relationship that you have 
with the person making the request, as well as the relationship 
that you hope to have with that person in the future.

Plenty of people -- strangers, friends and family members -- 
approach me about editing services.  When it is a stranger, I 
tell them my rates and ask for a description of the project.  
If I have the time and if I feel that I can add value, we often 
work out a deal.  If you find yourself in this position, I 
recommend starting with a sample, so that you can make sure 
you're compatible with the author, and insist on receiving a 
deposit up front before you begin the project.

The situation is far more delicate with friends and family 
members.  Their requests are flattering, showing that my reputation 
as a writer is growing in my personal circle (often the hardest 
set of people to impress).  But it can still be awkward, because 
(a) they often have no idea how much they are asking, (b) they 
may not like what I have to say, and (c) they may feel, and 
sometimes with good reason, that they should not have to pay me.

So, to do or not to do?  Sometimes with not-so-close friends I 
explain what is involved and the request evaporates when the 
friend realizes that the manuscript is not ready.  I try to 
point them in a helpful direction without losing too much time.  
With others, especially friends who are competent writers, I will 
often say yes because we make a trade: I will read their 
manuscripts if I can count on them to read mine.

Family and very close friends are another matter.  This is where 
bartering comes in.  My husband does all sorts of extra chores 
when I review his papers.  You may not be able to get hard cash 
when you do writing-related work for a family member, but you 
may get something repaired, be relieved of some tasks, or get 
taken out for dinner.

I also think it's good to sometimes say yes to the maybes, 
because they open up new markets and opportunities and even 
relationships.  One author who contacted me out of the blue 
requesting a favor has turned out to be an invaluable resource, 
making me aware of some publicity opportunities, while I was able 
to introduce her to some reviewers.  However, before I replied 
to her request I downloaded the free sample portion of her book 
from Amazon to evaluate her writing. 

Sometimes you should take the road that you have not traveled; 
it can make all the difference.

Maybe Later
-----------
These are potential projects that speak to you but which you 
cannot do right away.  Perhaps it is a neat idea but you need 
more work before you can fully commit to it.  In other cases you 
may not currently have the time, or the idea needs to simmer.

The MAYBE LATER projects are those that you need to save in some 
format so that you don't forget them.  Perhaps they will all be 
in one file with a few words associated with each.  As a project 
idea grows, you may give it its own document.

Having a file of MAYBE LATER projects can be extremely useful.  
It keeps your ideas and possibilities in reserve, so you don't 
feel as if you are losing them.  It means that you may not have 
to start your next project with a totally blank page, but can 
tackle it with a running start.  Knowing that you have other 
projects waiting for you can spur you to finish your current 
projects.  These are all good ways to manage your writing time.

=================================================================

Victoria Grossack studied Creative Writing and English Literature
at Dartmouth College, and has published stories and articles in
such publications as Contingencies, Women's World and I Love Cats.
She is the author of Crafting Fabulous Fiction, a step-by-step
guide to developing and polishing novels and short stories that
includes many of her beloved columns. With Alice Underwood, she
co-authors the Tapestry of Bronze series (including Jocasta,
Mother-Wife of Oedipus; The Children of Tantalus; and Antigone &
Creon), based on Greek myths and set in the late Bronze Age. Her
independent novels include The Highbury Murders, in which she does
her best to channel the spirits and styles of Jane Austen and
Agatha Christie, and Academic Assassination (A Zofia Martin
Mystery). Victoria is married with kids, and (though American)
spends much of her time in Europe. Her hobbies include gardening,
hiking, bird-watching and tutoring mathematics. Visit her website
at http://www.tapestryofbronze.com, or contact her at tapestry (at)
tapestryofbronze (dot) com. 

=================================================================

Copyright 2015 Victoria Grossack 

This article may not be reprinted or posted without the written
permission of the author.

Link to this article here: 
http://www.writing-world.com/life/maybe.shtml


*****************************************************************
EVERY WRITER NEEDS A HOLIDAY!  "The Writer's Guide to Holidays, 
Observances and Awareness Dates" offers 1800 events worldwide --
Instant inspiration for those days when you can't think of anything
to write about!  Holiday topics are a favorite of editors, so fuel
your inspiration and jumpstart your articles today!  Available in 
print and Kindle editions; for more information visit
http://www.writing-world.com/store/year/holidays.shtml
*****************************************************************

NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
================================================================= 

Former teacher returns library book after 63 years
---------------------------------------------------
An Alabama resident returned the school library book "Lydia Bailey" 
63 years overdue. His excuse? That he was a "slow reader"! His 
estimated fine of $1,500 was waived by the current librarian, who 
hadn't even been born when the book was issued to him, on the 
grounds that it was "the right thing to do". For more, visit: 
http://nbcnews.to/1P1s67V

Poland argues for reduced VAT on eBooks
----------------------------------------
Last year, the European Commission ruled that eBooks, unlike printed 
books, should be treated as a electronically supplied services and
not goods, and therefore VAT be levied on them at the standard rate. 
Poland has challenged this ruling on the grounds that the European 
Parliament was not consulted. For more, visit: http://bit.ly/1MTirf5

Amazon increases interest in translated works
---------------------------------------------
The company will spend $10 million to develop translations in 
mystery, thriller, women's fiction, historical fiction, literary 
fiction, memoir, science fiction and fantasy categories over the 
next five years. AmazonCrossing is currently open to submissions.
Visit: https://www.apub.com/imprint-detail?imprint=3

Amazon targeting fake reviewers in lawsuit
------------------------------------------
The online retailer has filed a court case in Seattle to sue about 
1000 writers who wrote fake reviews on Fiverr.com, in an attempt to 
stamp out those seeking to boost the appeal of their products. 
"While small in number, these reviews can significantly undermine 
the trust that consumers and the vast majority of sellers and 
manufacturers place in Amazon, which in turn tarnishes Amazon's 
brand." For more, visit: http://bloom.bg/1GkwbT7

*****************************************************************

THE WRITE SITES
================================================================= 

THE CREATIVE COMPETITOR
http://creativecompetitor.com/
Lots of competitions. Offers some author services and writing 
courses. Also a resource for how-to articles and book reviews. 
Subscribe to their free newsletter, which "overflows with news on 
writing competitions, author interviews, e-books, and festival 
news."

FIRST WRITER
http://www.firstwriter.com
Agents, publishers, contents, articles, editorial services, the 
whole shebang. They have the obligatory free newsletter to feed all 
this information in regular digestible chunks.

BANG 2 WRITE
http://www.bang2write.com/
Networking and writing craft tips, screenplays and novels Sample and 
template downloads and advice on the above. Recent posts include "5 
Questions to ask before The End" and happiness tips from various 
writers.

BUILD YOUR OWN BLOG
http://www.buildyourownblog.net/
Advice on how to start blogging and making money. This site is also 
running a free to enter $4000 Scholarship for New Writers, which is 
not to be missed!

*****************************************************************
WIN PRIZES FOR YOUR WRITING WITH THE LARGEST GUIDE TO WRITING 
CONTESTS, from Writing-World.com!  "Writing to Win" brings you 
more than 1600 contest listings from around the world.  You won't 
find a more comprehensive guide to writing contests anywhere.  
Available in print and Kindle editions from Amazon!
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1470025825/peregrine
*****************************************************************

NO-FEE WRITING CONTESTS FOR DECEMBER
================================================================= 
This section lists contests that charge no entry fees. Unless 
otherwise indicated, competitions are open to all adult writers. 

GOLDEN KITE AWARDS
------------------
DEADLINE: November 25
PRIZES: $2,500 to authors and illustrators in four categories
DETAILS: Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Book Text, and Picture Book
Illustration. Entrants must be members of SCBWI.
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: SCBWI Golden Kite Awards, 8271 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, 
CA 90048-4515, sararutenberg@scbwi.org 
WEB: http://www.scbwi.org/Pages.aspx/Golden-Kite-Award

DAVID J. LANGUM, SR. PRIZE IN AMERICAN HISTORICAL FICTION/
DAVID J. LANGUM, SR. PRIZE IN AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY/BIOGRAPHY
--------------------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: December 1 
PRIZES: $1,000 in each category
DETAILS: Historical fiction: Fiction set in the American colonial 
and national periods that is both excellent fiction and excellent 
history, and that, to some extent makes a delineation between 
fiction and history.  History: Legal history or legal biography 
that is accessible to the educated general public, rooted in 
sound scholarship, and with themes that touch upon matters of 
general concern to the American public, past or present.
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: The Langum Charitable Trust, P.O. Box 12643, Birmingham, 
AL 35202
E-MAIL: langumtrust@gmail.com.
WEB: http://www.langumtrust.org/histlit.html

GREEN EARTH BOOK AWARD
----------------------
DEADLINE: December 1
PRIZES: $1,000 to author, $1,000 to illustrator (or $2,000 to
author/illustrator)
DETAILS: Intended to promote books that inspire children to grow 
a deeper appreciation, respect, and responsibility for their 
natural environment. This is an annual award for books that best 
raise awareness of the beauty of our natural world and the 
responsibility that we have to protect it. Categories: Picture 
book, children's fiction, young adult fiction, children's 
nonfiction, young adult nonfiction. Book must have been published 
in the US in the preceding year.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Newton Marasco Foundation, ATTN: Green Earth Book Award, 
1760 Old Meadow Road, McLean, VA 22102; Jenny Schmidt, 
jschmidt@newtonmarascofoundation.org
WEB: http://www.natgen.org/green-earth-book-awards/

THE LYRIC COLLEGE POETRY CONTEST
--------------------------------
DEADLINE: December 1
GENRE: Poetry
DETAILS: Up to 6 poems, maximum 39 lines per poem. Open to 
undergraduates enrolled full-time in a US or Canadian college or 
university. 
PRIZE:  $500 and publication
CONTACT: The Lyric College Contest, c/o Tanya Cimonetti, 
1393 Spear Street, South Burlington, VT 05403, tanyacim@aol.com
WEB:  http://www.thelyricmagazine.com/colleage_all.html

SCHNEIDER FAMILY BOOK AWARD
---------------------------
DEADLINE:  December 1
GENRE:  Books
PRIZE:  $5,000 in three categories: books for ages 0-10, 11-13, 
and 14-18
DETAILS: The Schneider Family Book Awards honor an author or 
illustrator for a book that embodies an artistic expression of 
the disability experience for child and adolescent audiences. 
The book must portray some aspect of living with a disability 
or that of a friend or family member, whether the disability 
is physical, mental or emotional. Open to books published 
during the two years preceding the deadline. 
WEB: http://www.ala.org/awardsgrants/schneider-family-book-award

THOMAS & LILLIE D. CHAFFIN AWARD FOR APPALACHIAN WRITING 
--------------------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: December 1
PRIZES: $1,000 
DETAILS: Honors a book of poetry, fiction, or creative 
nonfiction by an Appalachian writer. 
CONTACT: Dr. Tom Williams, UPO 630, Department of English, 
Morehead State University, Morehead, KY 40351, 
english@moreheadstate.edu
WEB: http://www.moreheadstate.edu/content_template.aspx?id=4944

ELIE WIESEL PRIZE IN ETHICS ESSAY CONTEST
-----------------------------------------
DEADLINE: December 8
PRIZES: $5,000, $2,500, $1,500, 2x $500 
DETAILS: Open to full-time US junior and senior college 
students. Students encouraged to write thought-provoking 
personal essays that raise questions, single out issues and 
are rational arguments for ethical action. Suggested topics 
on website. 3000-4000 words. Student must have faculty sponsor.
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
CONTACT: Prize in Ethics Essay Contest, The Elie Wiesel 
Foundation for Humanity, 555 Madison Ave., 20th Floor, 
New York, NY 10022
WEB: http://www.eliewieselfoundation.org/prizeinethics.aspx

FRIENDS OF AMERICAN WRITERS BOOK AWARDS
---------------------------------------
DEADLINE: December 10
PRIZES: $2,000 minimum
DETAILS: The author must be or have been a resident of AR, IL, IN, 
IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD or WI; or the locale of the 
book must be in one of those regions. The books can be fiction 
or non-fiction of literary quality (not poetry). The book must 
be published in the calendar year prior to the awards year. We 
also give awards to juvenile works.
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: April Nauman,  Adult Literary Chairman, 1179 Wenonah 
Ave, Oak Park, IL 60304, A-Nauman@neiu.edu; Tanya Klasser, 
Juvenile Literary Chairman, 55 W. Delaware Place Unit 314, 
Chicago, IL 60610, brujota1@aol.com; for general questions 
e-mail info@fawchicago.org
WEB: http://www.fawchicago.org/awards.php

FIRST CRIME NOVEL COMPETITION
-----------------------------
DEADLINE: December 14
PRIZES: Advance against royalties of $10,000
DETAILS: Open to any author who has not published a novel 
(except self-published novels). Murder or another serious crime 
or crimes is at the heart of the story.
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
CONTACT: First Crime Novel Competition, St. Martin's Minotaur/MWA 
Competition, St. Martin's Minotaur, 175 5th Ave., New York, NY 10010 
(for information and entry forms), 
MB-MWAFirstCrimeNovelCompetition@StMartins.com (to obtain 
official entry form)
WEB: http://us.macmillan.com/minotaurbooks/writing-competitions 

LITERARY LAUNDRY
----------------
DEADLINE: December 15
PRIZES: $500 for best poem
DETAILS: All pieces submitted for review will be entered into 
consideration for our Awards of Distinction. Poets may submit
up to three pages of poetry, which could be one three-page poem 
or many short poems. 
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
WEB: http://web.literarylaundry.com/submissions

NEW VOICES YOUNG WRITERS COMPETITION
------------------------------------
DEADLINE: December 20
PRIZES:  $100 in each division
DETAILS:  Open to Writers aged 11-14 (middle school) or 15-18 
(high
school). Poetry, nonfiction, short stories. Middle School: 
Poetry 20 lines maximum, prose 750 words max; High school: 
Poetry 30 lines, prose 1,000 words.
WEB: 
http://newvoicesyoungwriters.com/nvyw-competition/how-to-enter.html 

DEAD OF WINTER HORROR CONTEST
-----------------------------
DEADLINE: December 21
PRIZES: Amazon gift cards, $35-$50 depending on # of entries
DETAILS: The judges prefer gothic, dark fantasy, erotic horror 
(PG-13 max), noir, psychological horror, quiet/soft horror, and 
suspense horror. The judges tend not to like sci-fi horror, 
extreme/splatter horror, Lovecraftian, etc. Please no creepy 
children, people who don't know they're dead, or overdone "monsters" 
(vampires, were wolves, sasquatch, etc.). As to gore level, we'd 
far rather know what's going on inside a character's head than to 
see it on a pike. Stories must be set in winter. 2000-3000 words. 
2015 theme is "The Neighborhood Children."
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required (dow2015@toasted-cheese.com)
E-MAIL: editors@toasted-cheese.com
WEB: http://tclj.toasted-cheese.com/contest-guidelines/

ANISFIELD-WOLF BOOK AWARDS
--------------------------
DEADLINE: December 31 
PRIZES: $10,000 
DETAILS: For outstanding works that contribute to our understanding 
of racism and our appreciation of the rich diversity of human 
cultures. Poetry books may be entered under the fiction category.
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Karen Long, c/o Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards, The Cleveland 
Foundation, 1422 Euclid Avenue, Suite 1300, Cleveland, OH 44115, 
Submit@Anisfield-Wolf.org
WEB: http://www.anisfield-wolf.org/submissions/submission-guidelines/

ERIC HOFFER AWARD FOR PROSE
---------------------------
DEADLINE: December 31 (quarterly)
PRIZES: $250
DETAILS: Open to short works of fiction and creative nonfiction, 
to 10,000 words, unpublished (do not submit if published online).
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes, required
CONTACT: The Eric Hoffer Award, P.O. Box 11, Titusville, NJ 08560, 
info@hofferaward.com
WEB: http://www.hofferaward.com/HAprose.html

JEFFERSON DAVIS BOOK AWARD
--------------------------
DEADLINE: December 31
PRIZES: "A modest cash award"
DETAILS: To recognize outstanding scholarship on the Confederacy 
and the Confederate period.  The Jefferson Davis Award is for an 
outstanding book-length work of narrative history published during 
the preceding year. 
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: See entry form for list of judges and addresses.
E-MAIL: jcoski@moc.org
WEB: https://acwm.org/book-awards

LOCAL POEM COMPETITION (UK)
---------------------------
DEADLINE: December 31 
PRIZES: £1,000
DETAILS: Submit up to three poems (max. 25 lines each), about 
something or someone from your home area. Your poem can be 
descriptive, romantic, historic, factual or personal, as long 
as there is a local connection. UK residents only. 
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: United Press, Admail 3735, London, EC1B 1JB, UK 
WEB: http://www.unitedpress.co.uk/competitions/

L. RON HUBBARD’S WRITERS OF THE FUTURE CONTEST
----------------------------------------------
DEADLINE: December 31 (quarterly)
PRIZES: $1,000, $750, $500, plus $5,000 grand prize for best story 
of year
DETAILS: Fantasy, Sci-Fi or Horror: All types of science fiction, 
fantasy and horror with fantastic elements, 17,000 words max. Open 
only to those who have not had professionally published a novel or 
short novel, or more than one novelette, or more than three short 
stories, in any medium. 
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: Yes
CONTACT: Writers of the Future Contest, P.O. Box 1630, Los Angeles, 
CA 90072
WEB: http://www.writersofthefuture.com/contest-rules-writers/

SPUR AWARDS 
-----------
DEADLINE: December 31
PRIZES: The Spur Award
DETAILS: Categories include novels, short stories, nonfiction 
books, documentaries, poetry, songs and more.  See website for 
full details, rules, and the list of judges to whom entries must 
be sent.  Open to works published in magazines, periodicals and 
anthologies, their creation dependent in whole or in part on 
settings, characters, conditions, or customs indigenous to the 
American West or early frontier. To be eligible, works submitted 
must be set in the American West, the early frontier, or relate to 
the Western or frontier experience. 
ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: WWA Spur Awards Chair, Eli Paul, 5559 NW Barry Rd #362, 
Kansas City, MO 64154, elipaul2014@yahoo.com
WEB: http://westernwriters.org/spur-awards/

MONTHLY/RECURRING COMPETITIONS:
===============================
The competitions below are offered monthly unless 
otherwise noted; all require electronic submissions.

FANSTORY.COM
------------
PRIZES: $100 and other prizes
DETAILS: Various monthly fiction, nonfiction and poetry 
contests; for some, you must become a member of the site.
WEB: http://www.fanstory.com/contests.jsp

FICTUARY
--------
PRIZES: $50, promotion, publication; 2 runners up - 
publication
DETAILS: Monthly short fiction contest.  Winning stories 
featured in Feed Me Fiction short story magazine.  Any 
type of fiction; 1000-4000 words.  Monthly; winners 
announced by 15th of following month.
WEB: http://fictuary.com/short-story-contests/

THE NEXT BIG WRITER
-------------------
PRIZES: $100, $50, $25, plus review and membership
DETAILS: Must be a member. Competitions throughout the year, 
including novels and flash fiction. 
WEB: http://www.thenextbigwriter.com/competition/index.html

SCRIBOPHILE WRITING CONTESTS
----------------------------
Bimonthly/Quarterly
PRIZES: $50 to $100 Amazon gift certificates
DETAILS: Short stories, flash fiction, poetry, on themes 
posted on website.
WEB: http://www.scribophile.com/contests/ 

WRITER'S DIGEST YOUR STORY COMPETITION
--------------------------------------
Bimonthly
PRIZES: $100 in WD books
DETAILS: We'll provide a short, open-ended prompt. In turn, 
you'll submit a short story of 750 words or fewer based on that 
prompt. You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after 
all, your story. 
WEB: http://www.writersdigest.com/your-story-competition

*****************************************************************
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT GIFT FOR THE WRITER IN YOUR LIFE?
Look no further than Writing-World.com's own unique line of mugs
for writers and book-lovers!  See our growing selection at 
http://www.writing-world.com/store/mugs.shtml 
*****************************************************************

ADVERTISE on WRITING-WORLD.COM!  For details on how to reach more 
than 100,000 writers a month with your product, service or book 
title, visit http://www.writing-world.com/admin1/adrates.shtml

*****************************************************************

Writing World is a publication of Writing-World.com
http://www.writing-world.com

Readers are welcome to forward this newsletter by e-mail IN ITS
ENTIRETY. This newsletter may not be reposted or republished in
any form, online or in print, nor may individual articles be 
published or posted without the written permission of the author
unless otherwise indicated.

Editor and Publisher: MOIRA ALLEN (editors"at"writing-world.com) 

Copyright 2015 Moira Allen




Copyright © 2017 by Moira Allen. All rights reserved.
All materials on this site are the property of their authors
and may not be reprinted without the author's written permission,
unless otherwise indicated.
For more information please contact Moira Allen, Editor